Tag Archives: Shiba Inu

10 Dogstagrams to Follow

Westminster Kennel Club
The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is the longest running continuously held dog sporting event, hosting its first show in 1877. The club even predates the American Kennel Club by 7 years! WKC has a wonderful Instagram account giving followers a backstage view of the show during competition season.

Puppy love 💜#WKCDogShow

A photo posted by Westminster Kennel Club

(@westminsterkennelclub) on

Frenchie Butt
This account follows the pawsitively adorable adventures of Seattleite French Bulldog, Milo. A self-proclaimed “bedbound butterball,” Milo can typically be seen sleeping, smiling, and being an overall derpy Frenchie.

rotate to see awk face 🙃

A photo posted by hi my name is milo 🐱🐷🐸🐰🍞🍗 (@frenchiebutt) on

 

Corgnelius
Two Corgi brothers, Corgnelius and Stumphrey, waddle their way through sunny Los Angeles. If you enjoy short legs and charming faces, this account is for you.

#fbf Corgi sniffing this bunny who coincidentally smells a lot like Stumphrey.

A photo posted by Corgnelius & Stumphrey (@corgnelius) on

The Dogist
The brainchild of photographer Elias Weiss Friedman, this stunning account uniquely captures the beauty of New York’s furriest residents. The images have been made into a book (also known as the perfect gift for the dog-lover in your life).

Taco The City Dog
Part Portie, part panda and a true city dog, Taco can be found exploring the Big Apple. He recently became big brother to a tiny human, lovingly dubbed “Chalupa.”

Off to jump in some puddles ☔️🐼💦#rainydaypanda #tongueouttuesday #littleredtacohood

A photo posted by Taco (@tacothecitydog) on

Brady The Golden Pup
As mischievous as he is adorable, Brady is guaranteed to be ray of sunshine in your Instagram feed. Brady first got his stardom after being featured on Huffington Post as the confused pup trying to catch painted-on fish in his baby pool.

Still goin after dis lemon business 🍋🍋🍋 #lillegs #fluffbutt #dogsofinstagram #puppiesofinstagram #goldenretriever

A video posted by Brady The Golden (@bradythegoldenpup) on

Menswear Dog
The most dapper dog you’ll ever meet, Bodhi, a six year-old Shiba Inu named after Patrick Swayze’s character in Point Break, has captured the hearts of the fashion industry and the general public alike.

American Kennel Club
The incredibly informative, educational account of the American Kennel Club is a must-follow for any dog enthusiast. AKC posts a “breed of the day,” along with relevant facts about said breed.

Your cure for the Monday-after-the-holiday-season blues. #AKCBreedoftheDay #AKCAustralianCattleDog

A photo posted by American Kennel Club (@americankennelclub) on

My Regal Beagle
Also known as Sid Pizza Dog, a five-year-old lemon and white Beagle and self-proclaimed Dog Mayor of Austin, TX. Sid must be the happiest dog, as he’s regularly seen with delicious treats like pizza, hotdogs, cookies and donuts.

is throwback monday a thing? plz watch my videos ➡️ #sidvid ___________________________ Snapchat➡️MyRegalBeagle

A photo posted by Sid Pizza Dog (@myregalbeagle) on

Samson The Dood
Samson is the coolest Goldendoodle (f1b to be exact) you’ll ever follow and probably the closest you’ll ever come to a living, breathing teddy bear. Fittingly, Samson resides in Brooklyn, NY and lives a more lavish life than any of us ever will.

When you’re trying to get to bed early & she stays connected #nophonezone 🚫📱#samsonandbea 🐶💤🐻

A photo posted by Samson The Goldendoodle (f1b) (@samsonthedood) on

A Spotlight on Service Dogs

A service dog is a dog trained specifically to assist people with disabilities such as visual impairment, hearing loss, mobility impairment, mental illnesses like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or health conditions such as diabetes.

It may not be that surprising to many dog lovers that on top of the all the amazing benefits the average pet dog provides, certain dogs have the capability to provide life-changing services for owners in need. More than just pets, service dogs are technically “working dogs.” To honor these incredible animals, we’re breaking down everything you need to know about service dogs, including which breeds are most suitable for service training, the process for a dog to become certified, and how you can get involved in service animal organizations.

Common Service Breeds
service-thumbnailThe breeds that tend to take well to service-based training are German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, and Border Collies. Yet, there are also other breeds that are best for specific disabilities. For instance, smaller breeds such as Setters and Shiba Inus are often used for seizure assistance. In general, small breeds are better suited for conditions that require medical alerts; but for mobility or balance issues, larger, stronger breeds are necessary.

Physical Assessment
The first step in evaluating whether a dog is a good candidate for service, is to schedule a nose-to-tail examination by a licensed veterinarian. If a dog has a condition like arthritis for example, he would not be considered a good candidate as the condition could inhibit him from performing his duties and add unnecessary strain to his body. Service dogs should all be neutered or spayed so they are not in heat while working. Age is also a factor as dogs should be at least 6 months old and past the puppy stage.

Personality Evaluation
Disposition and temperament are crucial factors in determining whether a dog is capable of becoming an effective service dog. A neutral personality that isn’t too active or too passive is the easiest personality type to train for service duties. A dog who is pretty even-tempered, rather than aggressive or overly submissive, is likely to be a great fit.

Sourcing A Reputable Trainer
Training a service animal requires a lot of expertise, patience and of course a tailored program customized to the illness or condition the dog is being trained to assist. While there is no required certification in the United States, the service dog training community has created self-regulated, minimum standards of which all trainers should meet. While anyone can learn to train their pet, it’s highly recommended to seek out a professional when it comes to service-based training. A professional trainer will put in the time (often hundreds of hours over 6 months to a year) and focus on “proofing,” which is the art of tuning out distractions and always being on command.

Public Testing
Intermittently throughout and certainly towards the end of the service-training program, professional trainers will take the soon-to-be service dogs into public environments and essentially test the dogs’ skills. Often equipped with a video camera, the trainers will test the dogs’ public conduct, including expectations such as only urinating and defecating on command, curbed excitement, no display of aggression and reduced hyperactivity.

Graduation and Registration
Once a dog successfully completes a service-dog training course, it’s the responsibility of the owner or trainer to register the dog with a reputable service organization such as the United States Service Dog Registry. Because service dogs are self-regulated in the U.S., it’s imperative that owners are diligent in completing the paperwork and registering their animal. A public record of a dog’s service training is helpful for any situation where the dog may be questioned or as evidence in the case of any sort of altercation. Remember, the dog just graduated an intensive program; it’s the least us humans can do!

Finding a Human Match In Need
Similar to trainer resources, there are plenty of places to find people in need of service animals. Remember, public accommodations for service dogs are only made if they’re accompanying a disabled individual.

Whether you have a dog you’re interested in training and donating to become a service animal, or you or someone you know is in need of a service dog, we hope you’ve found this information helpful. It truly is incredible that in addition to providing unconditional love, dogs can provide humans life-saving care.