The LAB Report: All About The Labrador Retriever


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The Labrador Retriever is the most popular breed in the country, and it’s no surprise why. We’ve broken down the top reasons why dog owners can’t get enough of the Lab. Disclaimer: You may shortly find yourself yearning to bring home one of these very special dogs after reading these 10 characteristics of Labs:

1. Very Trainable
Bred to follow human cues, Labs are extremely obedient if they receive proper training. In addition to the basic commands of sit, stay and roll-over, Labs can be taught more difficult tasks that require a high level of attention and intelligence.

2. Can Doggie Paddle
Natural-born swimmers, Labs were bred to jump into icy waters and help fishermen retrieve nets, fish and equipment. The extra skin (webbing) around their toes makes for natural paddles and their water resistant coat keeps them warm and dry in the water. Lastly, the Lab’s long round tail, often called an “otter tail,” moves back and forth in water like a ship rudder, making the Lab the Michael Phelps of dogs.

3. Easy-to-Manage Coat
Labs are short-haired, so you don’t need to brush them often, with the exception of during molting season. You also don’t need to bathe the Lab often as the natural oils in their skin serve as protection from outside irritants. In fact, it’s recommended to bathe Labs only 3-4 times per year.

4. Great with Kids
Want a nice, well-mannered family dog? The Lab is one of the best dogs for children of all ages. Labs are kind, good-natured, friendly, laid-back and affectionate. However, as puppies they can be rambunctious and unknowingly play a little rough. The good news is with a little bit of training (and maturity), they will respond well.

5. Athletic Sports Dogs
Part of the AKC-classified sporting group, Labs are willing to retrieve just about anything. Thus, if you’re interested in a breed to accompany you in hunting or fishing, Labs are a prime choice.

6. Selfless Helpers
Labs also make incredible service and therapy dogs. If you or someone in your family has a disability or illness that requires canine assistance, the Lab is a great option. Their intelligence and trainability, coupled with their readiness to please and affectionate streak make for a perfect combination. Labs are known for their ability to lead the blind, act as hearing dogs, and perform law enforcement and military work.

7. Active, Energetic Dogs
As you can tell from this article so far, Labs love exercise and are perfect companions to the active owner who loves the outdoors and daily walks. Whether playing a game of fetch, hiking, swimming, or fishing, Labs are in their element when they’re outdoors, and are not for your average couch potato.

8. Nose for Security
Labs are highly protective of their family members and home, so they make for effective watch dogs. If you’re interested in a dog who will bark at an intruder, the Lab is a great choice. Because Labs are considered “working dogs,” they are often trained to be professional security dogs.

9. Healthy with Long Lifespan
While every dog is different (just as humans are), some generalizations can be made for the healthiness of the breed. Labs are expected to live for at least 10 years, and have an average lifespan of 12 years. Thus, if they’re taken good care of, they’ll be around for lots of memories to be made.

10. Affordable
Although the Labrador Retriever is a purebred, the breed is only #18 on the list of most expensive breeds factoring in all medical costs. That said, it’s worth assessing expected expenses to make sure the Lab (or any other breed) is within your budget.

Chewsing the Pawfect Bone: Is There Such Thing?


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When you give your dog a chew bone, you may think you’re simply giving him a tasty treat to snack on. But, in fact you’re doing much more. The perfect bone offers the potential for improved dental health, stimulating activity, soothing relief from teething pain and fulfillment of your dog’s innate urge to chew.

Some veterinarians say a good bone keeps the dentist away in that it can help scrape away plaque, control tartar buildup and prevent gum disease, helping to keep teeth white and reducing the risk of mouth problems. Bones can also do wonders for teething pain in puppies and stimulate the growth of adult teeth.

You may have learned the hard way by now that your pup likes to chew. Has he gotten into your shoe collection yet? Or what about your unprotected furniture? It only takes one ruined valuable to understand the importance of satisfying your puppy’s need to chew. Luckily, bones make for easy pacifiers. The right bone can entertain your dog for hours, keeping him distracted and active thereby offering two perks: a safe item to gnaw on, preventing destructive behavior and the benefit of tiring him out and relieving nervous energy.

That said, other veterinarians will dissuade you from giving your dog any bone at all due to concerns about fractured teeth, oral injuries, airway obstruction or gastrointestinal complications. Thus, it’s crucial to consult with your trusted, personal veterinarian before throwing your dog any sort of bone.

Once you’ve spoken with your veterinarian, if you receive bone approval and/or a recommendation, you’ll next want to understand your pup’s chewing rate and habits. For example, if your dog chews for short bursts of time and has a soft bite, your veterinarian may reccomend a treat or toy that softens easily*. Be sure to ask a professional for their pick based on your dog’s breed and needs. Alternatively, if your dog is an aggressive “power chewer,” you may want to try a nylon-based Nylabone, which is long-lasting and nearly indestructible. Keep in mind that this is a toy and NOT edible, so your dog should not be trying to eat the Nylabone! Or, do you have a pup who needs weight management? Try a healthy, grain-free chew made from all natural ingredients, which is also ideal for a dog who has digestive issues. A general rule that applies to any and all safe-to-chew bones are that they’re specially prepared for dogs, are rock-hard and virtually shatterproof. Bones should also be sterilized, natural and digestible for sensitive stomachs.

But, we do have a few crucial “bones to pick.” First, under no circumstance should you feed your dog cooked fish, chicken or beef bones from your own meal. Bones that are too small or too soft can easily splinter and quickly become choking hazards or cause critical digestive issues. And, never feed your pup raw bones such as beef tails or necks from poultry as they carry bacteria like salmonella and e-coli and can spoil quickly. Also, only offer bones to your pooch when you’re around and close by to supervise. If you do decide to leave your pup alone with a bone, make sure it’s a large joint bone free of small pieces that could pose a choking threat, and that you toss the bone within 1-2 days to prevent bacteria from growing, which can result in digestive disorders or parasites.

Remember to always consult with your vet and use discerning judgment when it comes to “chewsing” your dog’s bone.

*While a popular choice among dog owners, rawhide bones should be avoided because they can be dangerous, especially to puppies. According to PuppySpot veterinarian Dr. Brandon Sinn, the bones can cause upset a dog’s stomach if swallowed and also pose a choking hazard. In particular, rawhide bones made in China have a tendency to have bacterial contamination. “If done right they are OK at best, but with the wrong dog can be deadly,” warns Dr. Sinn. 

7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Siberian Husky


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Siberian Huskies are the wolf-like snow dogs Americans have come to love, and it’s little wonder why. They’re friendly, even-tempered and gorgeous dogs. For these reasons and more, they’ve snagged the #7 spot on our list of most popular dog breeds. Read on for 7 facts you need to know about Huskies!

1. Huskies are one of the oldest dog breeds.

Huskies could be around 27,000 years old, according to scientific evidence. DNA from the bone of the ancient Arctic Wolf, a close relative of the Husky, provides a clue suggesting that Huskies are one of the oldest dog breeds.

2. They’re made for the snow.
It’s a given that Huskies thrive in cold climates, but do you know which of their features make this true? For starters, their thick double-coat keeps them warm in temperatures under negative fifty degrees Fahrenheit! In addition, their furry, sturdily-clawed paws gave them a good grip on rough, icy terrains. They can also dig deep enough holes to shelter themselves from chilling winds.

3. They have unique physical features.
Huskies often have icy-blue eyes that match their affinity for the cold, and many times, they will even have two different-colored eyes, a trait called heterochromia. In this case, one of the two eyes will almost always be blue. Their coats also come in six different shades, according to the AKC: agouti and white, black and white, gray and white, red and white, sable and white and just plain white.

4. They make great family dogs.
Never mind their great strength and vigor; Huskies aren’t as intimidating as they look. They make gentle companions to all members of the family, both big and small. While they generally require more obedience training than other breeds, they do not have an aggressive reputation, and will be loyal to their trusted pack.

5. They’re champion sled dogs.
Huskies first joined the All Alaska Sweepstakes Race in their second year of competitions. After a team of Siberian Huskies won the 400-mile race in 1910, the breed remained victorious for the remainder of the decade, winning most of the racing titles in Alaska.

6. They’re town heroes.

Huskies are more than just medal-winning sled dogs; they’re heroes, too. When an outbreak of diphtheria plagued the inhabitants of Nome, Alaska in 1925, teams of the valiant dogs raced to the scene to deliver life-saving medicinal serum.

7. They have a loud howl.
Much like their relative the wolf, Huskies are known to howl rather than bark. Their howl can be heard from up to 10 miles away!

What do you love about Huskies? Comment below and share with us!

Dog Recall Alerts


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We all want the best for our pets, and one way to ensure that your pets are healthy, happy, and safe is to keep an eye on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recall list. There are many reasons that a dog food might be recalled, and a recall does not always mean that the dog food is unsafe. In some cases, recalls are issued as a preventative measure “just in case,” but it is important to know where to find this information and what to do if you find that one of your pet’s favorite products has been recalled.

The FDA keeps a current list of all animal and veterinary recalls. This list includes specific manufacturer and batch information as well as details of why the product is being recalled. If you find that you have recalled food, supplements, toys, or any other products in your home, in most cases you will be able to return these products to the store for a full refund. The FDA provides details of what actions you can take if you find that a product you have purchased has been recalled.

If you feel that a product you have purchased for your pet is defective and it does not appear on the recall list, we recommend contacting the manufacturer. You can also report a food complaint or report a problem with drug side effects.

FIND CURRENT RECALLS

A Step by Step Tutorial to Leash Training


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We’ve all seen those dogs. The ones who zig-zag every which way on their walks. Those who mark on every tree. Those who drag their owners down the street. It begs the question: Who’s walking who anyway?

Prevent these unfortunately common situations from becoming your situation by leash training as soon as you’re able to take your puppy for walks. While it may seem simple (hook leash to collar and walk, right?), you’ll soon find that walking in a straight line at a normal pace is not a natural habit for your active puppy and it’s as new to him as everything else being introduced into his world.

By following these steps, you’ll be on your way to walking your pawfect pooch down the street with ease and confidence.

1. Choose the Right Leash and Collar
Make sure the collar is the perfect fit by asking for professional help with sizing. It’s important that it’s not too tight nor too loose. A good rule of “thumb” is to be able to fit two fingers between the collar and your pup’s skin. You may want to consider a harness instead of a collar to avoid neck strain from leash pulling. A harness is a good option for dogs with pushed-in faces that often experience breathing, trachea/throat problems, or have elongated, slender necks such as Pugs, Pomeranians, and Greyhounds respectively.

As far as leashes go, there are a variety of materials and lengths available, so to make the right decision, you’ll want to test them out at the pet store with your dog present. A few things to consider – nylon leashes which are the most common may cause “leash burn” if you have a strong dog that pulls suddenly. Leather leashes are stronger, provide a natural give, and will soften with time. Chain leashes, which are an inexpensive choice, can be dangerous if a strong dog pulls and the leash is wrapped around your finger and could injure you or the dog if the weight of it falls hard on you or him. Retractable or “flexi” leashes are designed to give dogs more freedom, but can be dangerous for a puppy as they provide the owner with much less control. “Reeling in” your pooch fast enough in an emergency is a challenge. Plus, the instinct of pulling the leash when your dog does something wrong could give you a severe rope burn if you were to grab that thin cord. We strongly advise against a retractable leash for a puppy in leash training.

The length of the lead is also a factor to consider when choosing the right leash for you. If you live in the city, a 4-foot might be long enough to allow your dog to do his business while keeping him close to your side. If you live in a suburban setting and have a bit more space to walk, you may want to choose a 6-foot lead.

2. Introduce The Collar and Leash
Slip the collar and leash on your pup while he’s doing something positive such as feeding, playing or getting pet. This way, the puppy associates the collar and leash with positive activity. If the dog resists, use treats or toys as incentive to getting him to feel more comfortable.

3. Take Your First Walk…Inside
Guide your puppy around your home so he gets used to you leading him around without all of the new smells and distractions of the outdoors. If you have a backyard, use that space as an opportunity to walk your pup outside to the spot where you want him to do, as opposed to letting him have run of the yard.

4. Teach to Follow
Getting your dog to “heel” is a gradual process so don’t expect it to happen quickly. Technically, the “heel” position is for your pup to walk along your left side at knee level. This is a bit ambitious and unnecessary for rudimentary leash training, so don’t worry so much about positioning as keeping your pup at a safe, comfortable distance. Hold the leash with a firm grip and double up any extra slack so it doesn’t drag on the ground. Make sure you have treats at the ready in your pocket to reward whenever your pup listens to you.

Once puppy is focused on the reward, say a simple command like “Let’s go!” – make sure it’s something you’ll remember to use consistently. Once he follows, give him a treat. You could bring it as close to right under his nose to get his attention. Continue to repeat this process in order to lure him into the pace and direction you want to him to go in.Once he’s performed this exercise several times well, offer the treats less and more intermittently.

If your dog pulls, quickly turn and walk in the opposite direction. You’ll do some stop-and-start at first, but eventually he’ll become accustomed to the rules. Reinforce the distance and pace you want him to keep by continuing to reward with praise and treats when he does follow. Some dogs may decide to sit or lay down rather than move. If this happens, call your pup and offer him a reward once he comes over. Never yank the leash toward you. Once he decides to walk next to you, offer him a treat.

5. Slowly Add More Depth to Your Training
Once your dog is walking well on a leash alongside you, you can work on other techniques such as “sit” whenever you stop, introducing the “heel” command, and increasing the amount of distractions in the surrounding area (if you’ve been practicing on your cul-de-sac, take him to a park or busy street).

3 Ways to Tell You Picked the Right Pet Sitter


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Choosing a pet sitter can be incredibly stressful. We all love our pets like family and want the very best for them! But how do you know if the sitter you’ve selected is the right one for your dog?

Our friends at DogVacay – the leading online service connecting pet owners with the best sitters across the U.S. and Canada – have given us some tips on how to find the perfect sitter for your pet.

Whether you’re a first-time boarder or just getting to know a new dog caretaker, here are three signs to look for that you’ve chosen the very best sitter for your dog.

1.Their reviews speak highly of their experience.

Thanks to sites like DogVacay, dog sitters can now be reviewed online like everything else! Dog lovers are a close-knit community, so knowing how other owners felt after their dog’s stay with a particular sitter can give you some serious peace of mind. Read the online reviews of your sitter carefully and look for things that make you feel reassured. Have past guests spoken highly of the host’s punctuality and attentiveness? Are there pictures of the host sitter with happy-looking pooches?

It’s also a great sign when the sitter you’ve chosen has a lot of return clients. It’s a huge sign of trust when a dog owner leaves their pet in someone’s care not once, but multiple times. Think of online reviews as referrals from friends and family…your dog friends and family!

2. They never make you feel like a burden.

A great dog sitter will understand your anxiety about leaving your dog with someone new. They’ll never push you to do anything you’re uncomfortable with and they’ll start your interactions by being polite and responsive, either online or over the phone. They won’t make you feel like a nuisance when you ask for a meet-and-greet (which is, by the way, always a good idea!) and they’ll be friendly and comfortable with your pet when you meet in person.

Once you leave your dog with a sitter, they should reassure you as much as necessary. A sitter who frequently sends pictures and updates is a thoughtful one! They understand that taking care of a dog parent’s anxiety is as important as taking care of the dog’s. Be sure to be very upfront with you dog sitter about how much communication you expect while your dog is in their care and if you want an update, don’t hesitate to ask!

3. Your dog doesn’t want to leave!

If you’ve left your dog with a new pet sitter, you’re probably excited to get home and pick him up! If your dog doesn’t immediately bound in your direction when you open the door, don’t be offended – that’s a great sign he’s comfortable where he is! Hopefully your dog will learn to feel calm, reassured, and at home in your dog sitter’s presence.

When you pick your dog up, a great pet sitter will show genuine signs of sadness that your pup’s stay is over! If they’ve formed a connection over the stay, you’ll probably be able to tell. The sitter shouldn’t hesitate to give you a report on how your dog did. If they bring up something troubling (your dog was anxious the whole first day or that he wouldn’t eat, for example), take that as a sign they’re willing to be open and honest with you in the dog’s best interest.

At the end of the day, knowing you’ve found a great pet sitter is more about gut feeling than anything else. If you feel comfortable with the person tasked with watching your dog, your dog will feel comfortable, too. They pick up on our emotions!

The easiest way to ensure you’re searching reputable, experienced pet sitters is to use a trusted online platform like DogVacay.com. With reviews from thousands of dog owners around the world, it’s impossible not to find a dog sitter you love!

Do Hypoallergenic Dogs Really Exist?


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Contrary to popular belief, there is no such thing as a truly hypoallergenic dog breed. Though, certain dog breeds cause fewer allergy symptoms than others. The misconception comes from the idea that a dog’s fur is the culprit of allergies. However, the real source is a protein that’s found in dog saliva and urine. This protein then sticks to dander, the dry flaky stuff that lives on your pup’s skin.

Some dog breeds are then somewhat misleadingly described as hypoallergenic because they don’t shed fur or shed very little. Because these non-shedding dogs rarely release fur, the allergy-causing dander doesn’t get released as often into the air, floor or furniture. Instead, the dander sticks to the skin.

If you or someone in your home does have allergies, there are ways to reduce allergy symptoms. Here are a few tips for managing dog allergies as best as possible:

1. Consider a smaller dog, as they will shed less and therefore release less dander into the air and your home.

2. Give your dog boundaries within the home to create allergy-free zones. For instance, don’t allow the dog in places where the allergic person resides most frequently, such as the bedroom. And, if you have a guest visiting who’s allergic, put the dog outside to keep your guest as comfortable as possible.

3. Ditch the carpet. A wood or tile-floor is easier to keep clean. Use a vacuum with a special micro-filter to collect all dust particles and get your carpet professionally cleaned on a regular basis. On a general note, learn to love housework. The cleaner the home, the less chance for dander to build up on surfaces, furniture and bedding.

4. Bathe your dog regularly for obvious reasons. A good cleansing and brushing will remove excess hair filled with dander, which would otherwise end up in your home.

5. Use an air purifier and HEPA vent filters to help reduce the amount of airborne allergens. Besides dander, these filters will also filter out pollen and dust mites from the air you breathe.

6. Wash your hands. Whether you’re frequently petting your dog, or just plain touching things that he may have brushed up against, frequent hand washing is helpful in preventing the dander from sticking to hands, which may then travel to your eyes and nose.

7. Mitigate with medication. There are plenty of over-the-counter medications like antihistamines, which can provide much-needed relief for allergy symptoms such as congestion or itchy eyes. For asthma or wheezing however, you may need a prescription from your physician.

8. Consider allergy shots. Allergy vaccinations can help you develop the antibodies necessary to combat common allergens. This option however should only be considered if you plan to live with a dog long-term and symptoms are too severe to take medications daily. While immunotherapy (allergy shots) can be an effective treatment plan, it’s quite a long road towards the potential of feeling relief. It can take a year of weekly injections before converting to monthly maintenance doses, and then another 3-5 years of monthly shots before you no longer have symptoms (and don’t need medication).

9. Invest in preventative products such as impermeable covers for mattresses and pillows because allergen particles brought into the room on clothes and other objects can accumulate in them and cause more intense symptoms.

10. Don’t blame the dog. While allergies can be terribly uncomfortable and frustrating to live with, remember it’s not your dog’s fault so do not get angry with him. Dogs can’t help the fur and dander they were born with. Plus, it’s not uncommon for someone prone to allergies to be allergic to other allergens in the home other than dander. So before attributing all symptoms to Fido, consider other allergens in your environment that could also be responsible for your symptoms such as dust, insecticides, pollen, or cigarette smoke.

Common Puppyhood Illnesses: Coccidia


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Just as non-furry children tend to get childhood illnesses like chicken pox, puppies can also be susceptible to similar puppyhood illnesses. One fairly common illness that you may encounter is coccidia, also known as coccidiosis. Coccidia are single-celled organisms that can infect a puppy or adult dog’s intestinal tract. It may sound scary, but it is generally mild and easily treatable. Like many puppy illnesses, the main symptom is diarrhea. It is important to bring your puppy in to the vet any time he displays signs of digestive distress to ensure prompt treatment of any illnesses. This will also help prevent the problem from spreading to other pets that your pup may come in contact with. We’ve spoken to our veterinary consultant, Dr. Brandon Sinn, to bring you everything you need to know about identifying and treating coccidia in your puppy.

Signs and Symptoms

The symptoms of coccidiosis are mild to severe diarrhea and loss of appetite, but may also include vomiting in severe cases. Diarrhea can be a sign of other infections such as Giardia as well, so your vet will need to perform a stool sample test to confirm the diagnosis. Symptoms generally appear approximately 13 days from initial infection. Most dogs and puppies will recover quickly from coccidiosis, but it is important to get prompt treatment to prevent dehydration and other complications.

How does Coccidia spread?
Like Giardia, coccidia infection is spread through feces. You may have noticed that your puppy is very interested in the droppings of dogs and other animals. While this is perfectly normal behavior, it is best to keep them away from animal droppings to prevent diseases like coccidia that spread through the ingestion of infected fecal material. Similarly, if your own puppy has been diagnosed with coccidia, it is important to clean up after him promptly to help protect other dogs who may come to investigate.

Puppies and adult dogs with compromised immune systems are particularly at risk for coccidiosis. A healthy adult dog with a strong immune system may show no signs of infection and suffer no ill effects themselves, but can still spread coccidia to other animals.

Treatment and Prevention
Drugs such as Albon (sulfadimethoxine), Tribrissen (trimethoprimsulfadiazine) and Marquis have been effective in treating dogs infected with coccidia. These drugs work by preventing the coccidia organisms from reproducing, which gives the puppy time to build up an immunity. While these drugs do not completely eradicate a coccidia infection, they do resolve the puppy’s symptoms. They can also be given to prevent future flare-ups in an adult dog with a history of coccidiosis.

There are many preventative measures you can take to keep your puppy healthy and free from coccidia and other puppyhood illnesses. Always pick up after your dog after he goes to the bathroom and be sure to provide him with clean drinking water. It is best to discourage him from hunting small animals, as they may carry coccidia and can transfer the infection to your dog if they are eaten. If your puppy shows any symptoms of coccidia or another illness, do not hesitate to contact your veterinarian!

With proper treatment and preventative measures, coccidia infection can pass quickly and uneventfully and will not impact your puppy’s quality of life.

7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Poodle


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Poodles are poufy and proud, and they’re #6 on our list of most popular dog breeds. The popular show dogs are known for their intelligence, grace and of course, their beautiful curly coats. We bet you don’t know it all when it comes to this breed, though. Here are 7 facts you need to know about the Poodle!

1. They’ve got beauty and brains.

Poodles are not only lovely to look at; they’re also highly intelligent. They’re the second-smartest dogs in the world according to the AKC, just under the Border Collie.

2. They’re a good choice for people with allergies.
Because their curly coats resemble hair more than fur, Poodles are considered virtually hypoallergenic, odorless and tend to be a good choice for those with allergies to shedding dogs. However, like human hair, their fur grows continuously and needs to be managed accordingly.

3. They come in three sizes.

The poodle is the only dog that comes in three sizes: standard, miniature, and toy. However, they are all the same breed. Standard poodles weigh 40-70 pounds, miniature poodles 15-17 pounds, and toy poodles a miniscule 6-9 pounds.

4. There’s a reason for those bulbous hairdos.

Your first image of a Poodle is most likely the meticulously groomed pooch with perfectly shaped spheres of fluff. Turns out there’s a specific use for what’s known as the “Poodle clip.” Relevant to its history as a water retriever, the Poodle’s fancy haircut is meant to strategically protect its joints and vital organs in cold water. Interesting, huh?

5. They’re globally coveted dogs.
While the breed originated in Germany, many think of Poodles as a French breed because of the widespread popularity Toy Poodles have achieved, starting in France under the rule of King Louis XVI. They even hold the title as the official dog of France! Poodles continue to receive worldwide allure; recently, toy brown poodles have become the current pet trend in Asia.

6. They’re athletic.

Despite their reputation as prim and proper dogs, Poodles love to get down and dirty. They’re great swimmers, and were originally bred to hunt water fowl. Along with their strong, springy legs, they also have plenty of energy to do the tricks you’ll see them perform at dog shows.

7. They were the pet of many famous celebrities.
Poodles are a favorite among both past and present celebrities, the list of which includes famous figures like Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Streisand, Jackie Kennedy, Debbie Reynolds, Walt Disney and Rihanna. Perhaps the biggest celebrity Poodle enthusiast in history was King of Rock and Roll Elvis Presley, who gifted the popular pooches to the special ladies in his life.

Westminster Insight

At the 2017 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, a Minature Poodle named “Danfour Avalon As If” took the winning spot in the Non-Sporting Group.

Do you have a Poodle? Comment below and share what you love about Poodles!

14 Puppies Share the Love this V-Day


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Not only is Valentine’s Day a day for couples, but it’s also a day we appreciate those we love most, including our furry friends! Let’s celebrate this day of love with 14 PuppySpot puppies who have lots of love to share!

Zara the Mini Pinscher has lots of hugs and kisses for you!

This Frenchton puppy named Molly is all dressed up for her special date!

This Havanese pup’s heart is stuffed with puppy love!

Mr. Romeo the Maltese has eyes that stare straight into your soul.

What’s a Romeo without his Juliet?

Orchid the Lhasa Apso shows off new jewelry from her special someone.

Kenzie the Boxer is also rocking some bling!

Cupid the Goldendoodle will shoot an arrow through your crush’s heart!

This Dachshund puppy named Lucas wants to say those three little words!

Oscar the Borkie made sure not to show up without flowers!

Jasmine the French Bulldog wants a kiss on her heart-shaped nose!

This Beagle puppy named Jacie was bitten by the love bug.

Emerald the Cavalier King Charles puppy wants to know if you’ll be his Valentine.

Lastly, what’s Valentine’s Day without a little Love?

New Breeds to Debut at Westminster Dog Show


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Every year for four days in February, dog experts meet in New York City’s Madison Square Garden to judge dogs according to their breed standards at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. This year, three breeds new to the show will be judged for the first time: The Pumi, American Hairless Terrier and Sloughi. Will one of them win Best in Show?

Pumi

This newly recognized hound to the American Kennel Club (AKC) is the Pumi, a popular Hungarian herding dog first imported to Finland in 1972. This active breed loves to take direction and is an expert at herding sheep, cattle and pigs. Intelligent and alert, these dogs have a curly, Poodle-like coat which comes in black, white, gray and fawn. They do great in agility, and can be trained to compete in just about any event!

American Hairless Terrier

Who knew the playful, perky American Hairless Terrier was the result of a mutation? In 1972, a completely hairless puppy was born to a litter of otherwise normal Rat Terriers in Louisiana. The puppy was kept and well-received by its owners, who considered the spotted and pink-skinned pup a delight. From there, these dogs went on to begin the first hairless breed originating in the US. Their lack of fur makes them an excellent choice for people with allergies, though they still shed skin cells and need sunscreen to prevent their skin from burning. In addition, their alertness to unknown sounds make them great watchdogs. They come in a variety of colors and markings and excel at competitions that put their energetic bodies to use!

Sloughi

While new to the AKC and now Westminster’s hound group, the Sloughi is an ancient breed. Also called the Arabian Greyhound, the Sloughi originates from North Africa and was developed further in the US and Europe. Part of what makes Sloughis unique is that they are sighthounds, meaning they rely primarily on their sight, rather than their nose, to hunt. These sleek and noble dogs will be an interesting sight at this year’s show!

 

All amazing dogs, yet these are only three of the many breeds set to take the stage this weekend. Which breed are you rooting for this year?

5 Things You Didn’t Know About the Goldendoodle


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#5 on our list of most popular dog breeds is the Goldendoodle, a “designer dog” cross between a Golden Retriever and Poodle. The breed hybrid was developed in the 1990’s to have the friendly, energetic nature of a Golden Retriever and the allergy-friendly coat of a Poodle and has since become one of the most popular American dogs. Here are 5 facts you need to know about Goldendoodles!

1. They’re a good choice for people with allergies.

While Goldendoodle fur varies from dog to dog, the hybrid tends to be a good choice for those with allergies to shedding dogs. Because of its Poodle-like fur, Goldendoodles hardly shed and are virtually hypoallergenic.

2. They’re brainy.
Both parent breeds of the Goldendoodle are in the top 5 of highest ranking in intelligence. The Poodle is #2, while the Golden Retriever is #4. This mix of smarts makes for one brainy pup.

3. They have good genes.

As a cross between two different breeds, Goldendoodles have a healthy genetic pool of variation. According to Goldendoodles.com, first generation (F1) crosses (the product of a Golden Retriever and Poodle) have the highest “hybrid vigour,” which is the idea that the first generation offspring are healthier than each of their individual parent lines. Subsequent crosses decline in this vigor.

4. They go by more than one name.
While “Goldendoodle” is the common name for this Golden Retriever-Poodle cross, they can also go by “Golden Poos”, “Goldie Poos”, or “Groodles.”

5. No two Goldendoodles are alike.
Since Goldendoodles are not purebreds, the characteristics of any one Goldendoodle cannot be predicted. A first generation Goldendoodle may look more like its Poodle parent or its Golden Retriever parent, and may possess any variation of personality or genetic qualities from either of its parents. These qualities become more consistent as Goldendoodles are bred between each other.

Do you have a Goldendoodle? Tell us about your furry friend in the comments below!

9 Pups Who Prove Smiling is Contagious


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It’s been proven that smiling is contagious and that your pooch can recognize human emotion on faces. We dare you to look at these pleased pups and not reciprocate their cheerful dispositions.

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This Shipoo is delighted to see you.

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This Bulldog wants a high-five.

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This Springer Spaniel is pleased as punch.

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This Husky is drunk with laughter.

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This German Shepherd wants you to THROW THE BALL ALREADY.

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This Pomeranian has never been happier to go for a ride in the car.

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This Shar-Pei is relieved to take a nap.

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This Shichon is takes “Tongue Out Tuesday” very seriously.

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This Corgi is ready for his close-up.