Loudest Dog Breeds

Dog barking occurs for all kinds of different reasons. Some dogs bark out of boredom or anxiety, while others are merely naturally vocal. While barking can certainly be a nuisance, it’s important to remember that this is one of the primary ways that our canine counterparts communicate.

The good news is, in many instances it is possible to train our dogs not to bark. However, some breeds are more prone to barking than others. If you’re considering adding a dog to your family, it’s always good to know exactly what you’re getting into.

As pet parents, it serves us well to learn the triggers for dog barking.

If you live in an apartment building, a breed that is prone to excessive dog barking may be a deal breaker. On the contrary, if you live in a rural area a pup with watchdog tendencies may be ideal!

In this article, you’ll learn about which some of the loudest dog breeds are. If you’re considering one of these breeds, this article will help you understand why they bark and whether or not they’re a good fit for your lifestyle.

1. Golden Retriever

Golden Retriever
Your Golden will have a big, deep bark, but she likely won’t be a reliable watchdog due to her friendly nature.

The Golden Retriever is routinely chosen as one of America’s favorite dog breeds due to her good nature and adaptability. She is a friendly, devoted pet and doesn’t tend to be aggressive towards people or other dogs.

Your Golden will have a big, deep bark, but she likely won’t be a reliable watchdog due to her friendly nature. That said, if she senses anything awry, she will let you know.

Your Golden may bark out of boredom or anxiety if she is left alone for extended periods of time. If you bring home your Golden Retriever as a puppy, be sure to help her adapt to being on her own for gradually longer and longer periods to curb separation anxiety.

Some Golden Retrievers are more prone to barking than others, but generally speaking, a well-trained Golden isn’t going to bark excessively.  

2. German Shepherd

German Shepherd
German Shepherds are natural watchdogs and will typically bark when a stranger comes to the door, or she hears a threatening sound.

Like most dogs, German Shepherds are prone to barking when they are anxious or insecure. Because of their large size and their intimidating bark, it’s important to socialize German Shepherd puppies well from a young age, so they grow into confident, relaxed adults.

That said, German Shepherds are natural watchdogs and will typically bark when a stranger comes to the door, or she hears a threatening sound. Her powerful bark may sound frightening, but your GSD will relax as soon as she realizes that you are not in danger.

A German Shepherd typically makes a relaxed companion when you are home. If left home alone, she will warn anyone who arrives at the door of her presence but will settle when she realizes there is no immediate threat. As long as your GSD receives plenty of attention and exercise, she should not bark incessantly, even when you’re not home.

3. Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier
The word Terrier is practically synonymous with “dog barking.” Terriers as a whole are instinctively alert and reactive, and the Yorkie is no exception.

The word Terrier is practically synonymous with “dog barking.” Terriers as a whole are instinctively alert and reactive, and the Yorkie is no exception. That said, it is possible to minimize the amount of barking your Yorkshire Terrier does.

Yorkshire Terriers may be small, but they have huge personalities and tend to have a Napoleon complex. They may be sassy toward other dogs, particularly larger ones, which can result in maniacal barking if they feel at all threatened. Yorkies may also be possessive of their owners, and bark at other dogs (and sometimes people) who approach their loved ones.

Because these pint-sized pups are so attached to their people, they don’t tolerate being left alone for lengthy periods of time. Guess what they do when they feel anxious or bored? Ensuring your Yorkie is well exercised, and has plenty of interaction will do wonders to limit her tendency to bark.

Fortunately, barking can be alleviated or prevented with consistent training, especially when started from a young age. If you’re considering a Yorkie puppy commit to training and socializing her as soon as possible, and she’s sure to make a loyal and spirited companion.

4. Siberian Husky

Siberian Husky
The Siberian Husky isn’t known to bark excessively, but they are vocal dogs.

Siberian Huskies aren’t known to bark excessively, but they are vocal dogs. This means, while they are not reliable watchdogs, they may howl at sounds like sirens, or dogs barking in the distance.

Historically, the Husky worked in packs, and she tends to appreciate the company of other dogs. She will often bark to invite other dogs to play with her, or even when excitedly greeting a human friend. If you have multiple Huskies in your home, they may take to howling together in unison.

Like any intelligent dog breed, the Siberian Husky is prone to mischief when she doesn’t receive enough exercise or interaction. In some cases, her mischief will present in the form of barking, but not always.

While the Husky is not prone to constant barking, when she does raise her voice, it is hard to miss. With this in mind, she isn’t the best apartment dog. However, with sufficient training and exercise her barking and howling should be minimal.   

5. Maltese

maltese
Despite being toy-sized, the Maltese is brave and extroverted and makes an excellent watchdog.

Long favored by royals (including Marie Antoinette), this pup is one of the world’s favorite companion dogs. The Maltese sometimes has a reputation for being yappy, but like with other breeds, this behavior can be prevented or corrected.

Despite being toy-sized, the Maltese is brave and extroverted and makes an excellent watchdog. She has an opinion on everything and will let you know if she senses any disturbances, no matter how subtle.

Just like any alert and reactive pup, the Maltese has a tendency to bark any time she feels threatened, even if it’s only by an unfamiliar sound. Fortunately, your Maltese puppy can be trained to ignore unexpected sounds. Adult Maltese dogs can be trained to do so as well, but it will take a little more work. Just like any other dog, the Maltese is less likely to bark when she receives consistent exercise and play time.