Tag Archives: Beagle

14 Puppies Share the Love this V-Day


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Not only is Valentine’s Day a day for couples, but it’s also a day we appreciate those we love most, including our furry friends! Let’s celebrate this day of love with 14 PuppySpot puppies who have lots of love to share!

Zara the Mini Pinscher has lots of hugs and kisses for you!

This Frenchton puppy named Molly is all dressed up for her special date!

This Havanese pup’s heart is stuffed with puppy love!

Mr. Romeo the Maltese has eyes that stare straight into your soul.

What’s a Romeo without his Juliet?

Orchid the Lhasa Apso shows off new jewelry from her special someone.

Kenzie the Boxer is also rocking some bling!

Cupid the Goldendoodle will shoot an arrow through your crush’s heart!

This Dachshund puppy named Lucas wants to say those three little words!

Oscar the Borkie made sure not to show up without flowers!

Jasmine the French Bulldog wants a kiss on her heart-shaped nose!

This Beagle puppy named Jacie was bitten by the love bug.

Emerald the Cavalier King Charles puppy wants to know if you’ll be his Valentine.

Lastly, what’s Valentine’s Day without a little Love?

The 411 on Hot Spots


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Does your dog itch, scratch and lick himself so often in certain places that the affected areas become red, hot, irritated, or even bloody and scabbed? This ailment, also known as “hot spots” or “moist eczema,” is caused by a variety of factors such as bites, poor grooming, skin infections, stress or boredom, but is quite often the result of environmental allergies.

Allergens in the air such as dust or pollen often consistent with a change in seasons, increase a dog’s histamine levels, which set off uncomfortable itching that the dog tries to self-remedy by scratching, licking and biting. Not to be ignored, environmental allergies, also known as “atopic dermatitis” typically occur post puppy-hood after a dog is one years old, and become progressively worse over a dog’s lifespan.

Hot spots can not only be quite painful and irritating for dogs, but are also upsetting for the owner who has to watch and listen to a dog licking, scratching and inflicting self-trauma. Hot spots can severely affect the quality of the dog’s life and if left untreated, the hot spots will only worsen and develop into bacterial infection sites due to the combination of an open wound and surrounding moistness.

Certain breeds are more susceptible to hot spots, including Retrievers, Terriers, Boxers, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, Shepherds, Beagles and Irish Setters.

Medication Treatments for Relief:

Antihistamine Medication – Similar to treatment offered to humans who suffer from allergies, an antihistamine such as Benadryl or Claritin can be helpful as a first line of defense, at least for temporary relief. Remember to consult with your vet regarding the appropriate dosage for your dog based on weight. Unfortunately, these medications can often lose effectiveness if used too often and only work on 30% of dogs.

Steroid Medication – The next option, if an antihistamine isn’t doing the trick, is to discuss corticosteroid medications with your vet. A stronger Rx, these meds are often effective, but you must be careful with continued use, as they can present possible severe and permanent side effects.

Immunotherapy – Many veterinarians will say allergy shots are the only effective method to stop the progression of allergies. Similar to the skin testing performed on humans, a veterinarian will inject various allergens into the dog’s skin to test which cause reactions, and to which degree. The allergens are then mixed together to formulate the injection, which over time and if performed consistently, will desensitize your dog’s immune system. It’s recommended to start young as the older the dog gets, the less effective the treatment can be.

Immune-Suppressants – This option should only be explored if immunotherapy is not showing positive results or improvement. Immune modulator drugs suppress the immune system so that it does not respond to harmless allergens. However, these medications can cause side effects such as vomiting and diarrhea, and present an increased risk of infection from other illnesses.

Sublingual Immunotherapy – This is an alternative to allergy shots, if you’re concerned your dog may have a negative or aggressive reaction to an injection. With this treatment, the medication is administered by squeezing into their mouth.

Please know that each option should be thoroughly discussed and weighed with your veterinarian as treatments will vary based on the dog’s breed, size, and medical history.

Non-Medication Treatments for Relief:

Keep Your Dog’s Paws Clean – As a preventative measure, it doesn’t hurt to manually remove potential allergens from your dog’s paws after walks or hikes by washing or wiping thoroughly.

Use Medicated Shampoo – For bathing, ask your vet dermatologist for a recommendation on a specially-formulated shampoo designed to control inflammation on skin.

Try Supplements – Certain dietary pills with fatty acids such as biotin and Omega-3s are supposed to suppress itching and improve coat health.

Avoid Products with Known Allergens – If you’ve done a skin testing for your dog and are able to isolate certain allergens, take care with buying food or skincare free of those allergens.

Bathe Often and Follow Flea Control Regimen – A regularly groomed dog taking consistent flea prevention medication will have less risk of fleas and other irritants, which can cause hot spots.

Offer A Stress-Free Environment – Make sure your dog gets regular exercise and opportunities for play to relieve boredom.

Use a Temporary E-collar – While annoying for your dog, an Elizabethan collar or cone can be effective for stopping the itching and allowing the hot spot to heal.

Epilepsy in Dogs: Is My Dog at Risk for Seizures?


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Seizures don’t just affect those of us who walk on two legs. Our four-legged friends can also suffer from seizures, and if the fits of uncontrollable twitching turn into a pattern, your dog may have epilepsy.

About Canine Seizures
Seizures are uncontrollable outbursts of twitching or shaking which result from surges of electrical activity in your dog’s brain, according to WebMD. They can last anywhere from less than a minute to several minutes. Some causes of seizures in dogs include eating poison, liver disease, a sudden rise or drop in blood sugar, anemia, head injury, stroke and brain cancer.

Signs of an Epileptic Fit

You can usually tell when a dog is having a seizure because of the strange behaviors exhibited. Your dog will likely feel the seizure coming on, and seek out her owner for comfort. After a period of restlessness, whining or hiding, a dog having a seizure will show symptoms like muscle twitching, collapsing, vomiting or foaming at the mouth. Afterward, the dog will experience a period of disorientation ranging from a few minutes to days. She may even be temporarily blind during the recovery period.

Types of Seizures

There are a few different types of seizures. A generalized, or grand mal seizure, is the most common type, in which abnormal electric activity throughout the brain causes the dog to lose consciousness and shake erratically. Conversely, in a focal seizure, the abnormal electrical activity only occurs in one part of the brain, and will likewise cause movements in only one side or part of the body. Sometimes seizures start as focal and then become generalized. A psychomotor seizure takes the form of an odd behavior, such as interacting with an imaginary object or some other apparent hallucination. Whatever the behavior is, the same one will repeat in future seizures. Finally, seizures with no known cause fall under idiopathic epilepsy. They usually occur in dogs six months to six years old, and are most common in Labrador Retrievers, Australian Shepherds, Beagles, Belgian Tervurens and Collies.

What to Do
If you notice your dog having a seizure, remain calm. Avoid contact with her until she has calmed down, but if there is something nearby that may hurt her, be sure to move the object or gently slide her away, taking care to stay away from her mouth. If the seizure lasts more than two minutes, your dog is at risk of overheating. Any longer than five minutes, time to take her to the vet.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Be sure to record observations of your dog’s seizures. If a pattern develops, your vet should be able to identify the type of seizures and administer the appropriate medications. For example, valium may be given intravenously to control prolonged convulsions. And, to regulate future seizures, vets commonly prescribe phenobarbital and potassium bromide. It’s very important to adhere to the dosage recommended by your vet. It’s also recommended to check liver function before giving your dog anti-epileptic medications. While there is no cure for epilepsy, appropriate treatment can significantly reduce the frequency and severity of these frightful fits.

10 Dogstagrams to Follow


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Westminster Kennel Club
The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is the longest running continuously held dog sporting event, hosting its first show in 1877. The club even predates the American Kennel Club by 7 years! WKC has a wonderful Instagram account giving followers a backstage view of the show during competition season.

Puppy love 💜#WKCDogShow

A photo posted by Westminster Kennel Club

(@westminsterkennelclub) on

Frenchie Butt
This account follows the pawsitively adorable adventures of Seattleite French Bulldog, Milo. A self-proclaimed “bedbound butterball,” Milo can typically be seen sleeping, smiling, and being an overall derpy Frenchie.

rotate to see awk face 🙃

A photo posted by hi my name is milo 🐱🐷🐸🐰🍞🍗 (@frenchiebutt) on

 

Corgnelius
Two Corgi brothers, Corgnelius and Stumphrey, waddle their way through sunny Los Angeles. If you enjoy short legs and charming faces, this account is for you.

#fbf Corgi sniffing this bunny who coincidentally smells a lot like Stumphrey.

A photo posted by Corgnelius & Stumphrey (@corgnelius) on

The Dogist
The brainchild of photographer Elias Weiss Friedman, this stunning account uniquely captures the beauty of New York’s furriest residents. The images have been made into a book (also known as the perfect gift for the dog-lover in your life).

Taco The City Dog
Part Portie, part panda and a true city dog, Taco can be found exploring the Big Apple. He recently became big brother to a tiny human, lovingly dubbed “Chalupa.”

Off to jump in some puddles ☔️🐼💦#rainydaypanda #tongueouttuesday #littleredtacohood

A photo posted by Taco (@tacothecitydog) on

Brady The Golden Pup
As mischievous as he is adorable, Brady is guaranteed to be ray of sunshine in your Instagram feed. Brady first got his stardom after being featured on Huffington Post as the confused pup trying to catch painted-on fish in his baby pool.

Still goin after dis lemon business 🍋🍋🍋 #lillegs #fluffbutt #dogsofinstagram #puppiesofinstagram #goldenretriever

A video posted by Brady The Golden (@bradythegoldenpup) on

Menswear Dog
The most dapper dog you’ll ever meet, Bodhi, a six year-old Shiba Inu named after Patrick Swayze’s character in Point Break, has captured the hearts of the fashion industry and the general public alike.

American Kennel Club
The incredibly informative, educational account of the American Kennel Club is a must-follow for any dog enthusiast. AKC posts a “breed of the day,” along with relevant facts about said breed.

Your cure for the Monday-after-the-holiday-season blues. #AKCBreedoftheDay #AKCAustralianCattleDog

A photo posted by American Kennel Club (@americankennelclub) on

My Regal Beagle
Also known as Sid Pizza Dog, a five-year-old lemon and white Beagle and self-proclaimed Dog Mayor of Austin, TX. Sid must be the happiest dog, as he’s regularly seen with delicious treats like pizza, hotdogs, cookies and donuts.

is throwback monday a thing? plz watch my videos ➡️ #sidvid ___________________________ Snapchat➡️MyRegalBeagle

A photo posted by Sid Pizza Dog (@myregalbeagle) on

Samson The Dood
Samson is the coolest Goldendoodle (f1b to be exact) you’ll ever follow and probably the closest you’ll ever come to a living, breathing teddy bear. Fittingly, Samson resides in Brooklyn, NY and lives a more lavish life than any of us ever will.

When you’re trying to get to bed early & she stays connected #nophonezone 🚫📱#samsonandbea 🐶💤🐻

A photo posted by Samson The Goldendoodle (f1b) (@samsonthedood) on

When Your Dog Has Cancer


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Hearing your loved one has cancer can be devastating, whether it’s a family member or your furry friend. Yet in both pets and humans, cancer is a reality that cannot be ignored. In honor of Pet Cancer Awareness Month, we’ve put together a guide for understanding, detecting and treating cancer in dogs.

Types of Canine Cancer
thumbnail-cancer
According to WebMD, cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs over the age of 10, but experts say that half of all cancers are curable if caught early. Dogs can develop a variety of cancers including mast cell tumors, a form of skin cancer; malignant lymphoma, tumors in the lymph nodes; breast cancer, which occurs as mammary gland tumors; and soft tissue sarcomas. Other common types of cancer in dogs are Hemangiosarcoma or cancer of the blood vessels; Malignant Histiocytosis, which is cancer of the white blood cells; Melanoma; Osteosarcoma or bone cancer; and prostate cancer.

Causes
You may be relieved to know that while it may seem that cancer is an extremely common diagnosis in dogs, the main reason we are hearing about it so much these days is that dog owners are taking better care of their pooches to the point that dogs are living long enough to develop the disease. Cancer in any species is multifactorial, meaning that there is not a single cause one can pinpoint for why it develops, but the reasons are thought to be both hereditary and environmental. For the hereditary case, there are some breeds of dog more prone to cancer than others. You should be especially on the lookout for cancer if your dog is one of the following:

Among the possible environmental causes of canine cancer are intact sex organs, exposure to tobacco smoke and toxic environments.

Signs and Symptoms
Just like in humans, one of the most typical signs of cancer in dogs is an abnormal lump or bump. Other classic signs are a wound that doesn’t heal, any kind of swelling, enlarged lymph nodes or abnormal bleeding. These are signs that should be addressed immediately by taking your dog to a veterinarian. Especially if your dog is over the age of 10, there are other, subtler signs that should not be ignored, which include unusual odors, unusual weight loss, loss of appetite, respiratory problems, lack of energy or bone stiffness.

Treatment and Prevention
With early detection, cancer in dogs is very preventable. You can also lower your dog’s risk of breast or prostate cancer by spaying or neutering. In addition, healthy diet and exercise are always recommended to give your dog a long, happy life. However, if the cancer spreads quickly before it is detected, there are methods of treatment which still give your dog a chance at survival. Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy are among the common options. However, these can be costly and may require a specialized payment plan with your vet.

If your dog develops cancer, as distressing as the news it, it shouldn’t be a cause of complete hopelessness. A dog with just a small lump that needs to be removed has a very good long-term prognosis, and even cases of malignant cancer have at least a 60 percent success range, according to WebMD. Recovery should take months rather than years. While nobody wants to imagine their dog having cancer, awareness and early intervention of the disease can ultimately give your furry friend a long, healthy and happy life.