Tag Archives: Bulldog

Tips for Dealing with Dog Fur


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It’s a known fact that most dogs shed, but this doesn’t keep us from loving them. At the same, it can be a pain to find fur all over your clothes and furniture. Some breeds, such as Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies, shed more than others. Whatever the breed, we’ve got the tips you need to keep your dog’s shedding under control.

Brush, brush, brush!

Brushing your dog’s fur regularly (for some dogs, this means daily) pulls out the loose hair that will otherwise end up on your carpet. It will also leave Fido’s coat cleaner and softer and will prevent his fur from matting.

Invest in a good vacuum.

Especially if your dog sheds seasonally, you’ll need a good vacuum to pick up after his fur. Spare yourself the headaches that come with a weak-suction vacuum and get yourself a machine that will get the job done the first time.

Use a lint roller.

Don’t underestimate the power of a good lint roller. The simple, inexpensive product can be a lifesaver in a home with a super-shedding dog. Use an extra sticky lint roller such as this one to easily pick up stray fur from yourself and from around the house.

Feed your dog a high-quality diet.
Dog food made from mostly corn or grains can be difficult for your pup to digest, causing dry skin and excess shedding. Food allergies can also contribute to hair loss and skin issues, in which case a veterinarian should be consulted. A diet high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids can improve overall coat texture.

Choose the right brush for your pup.

The type of brush you use for your pup can make a big difference in controlling his shedding. Your veterinarian can advise on what kind of brush to use, but there are generally brushes for two fur types: short and long. For dogs like Beagles and Bulldogs with shorter coats, a natural-bristle brush or hound mitt can be used. For dogs with longer, thicker coats, especially double-coated breeds like Pomeranians and Collies, a slicker brush or rake makes a better tool for getting rid of all that fur. Start by brushing in the opposite direction of your pup’s hair growth, then brush again in the direction of hair growth to fully remove all the loose, dead fur.

Give your dog a bath.

Regularly bathing your pup is not only a staple of good doggy hygiene, but it is also key to a healthy coat. Products like NuVet Conditioning Oatmeal Shampoo help sooth itchy skin and prevent dryness that can ultimately lead to hair loss.

While shedding might be one of the few things we don’t quite love about our dogs, it doesn’t have to be a burden. Instead, grooming your pup can become a daily bonding activity for the two of you. Less fur, more fun!

Tips for Keeping Your Dog Safe This Memorial Day


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Above all else, Memorial Day is a day to recognize our fallen soldiers. But for many Americans, Memorial Day also means spending time with family and friends under the hot, nearly-summer sun. Because the long weekend is typically spent outside and dogs are often invited to join in the fun, it’s important to keep dog safety in mind. Follow these tips to keep Fido safe during the busy holiday festivities.

1. Beware at the BBQ.

The food at a barbeque or picnic can be awfully tempting to your curious pooch, who doesn’t know the difference between food he can and cannot eat. It’s your job to keep your pup away from foods that can be toxic to him, such as onions, avocados and grapes. Bring your dog his own food and keep him away from people food and drink, including alcohol, which can be extremely dangerous to your dog even in small amounts.

2. Choose your bug spray wisely.

Bug repellent keeps away pesky insects that can harm both you and your dog, but certain sprays might have an unintended effect on your pup. Human insecticides can cause neurological and respiratory issues in dogs, so make sure to choose a spray that’s Fido-friendly, especially if he’s not up-to-date on his flea and tick medication.

3. Don’t keep his identity a secret.
During this crowded and noisy holiday, it’s easy for your pup to get startled and run off. If at home, make sure the yard is fully gated or closed off so your pup doesn’t escape from your sight. If he’s in a place where he can run far and wide, the worst thing that could happen is that your dog gets lost without any identification to help him get back home. Make sure your dog has an ID tag with updated name, address and telephone number, or better yet, is microchipped to help locate him easily.

4. Keep him cool and comfortable.

Dogs can get dehydrated pretty quickly, and flat-faced dogs like Pugs and Bulldogs are especially prone to breathing problems in hot weather, so it’s important to keep an eye on a panting pooch. Make sure he has access to plenty of clean water, and keep him in the shade or indoors as much as possible to avoid overheating.

5. Watch out around the water.

While some dogs love to swim, others are not so fond of the water, and might not even know how to swim. Like you would with a young child, you should supervise your pup around the pool and not leave him unattended around a pool or lake. Similar precautions should be taken at the beach so as not to let your pup get washed away by strong ocean currents. Let him get wet if he wants, but just monitor the activity.

6. When in doubt, keep him indoors.

The best way to keep your pup safe during the holiday is to leave him at home, but if he must come with you, then at least opt to keep him indoors as much as possible. Memorial Day weekend is often filled with sights and sounds that can overwhelm your sensitive pup, so avoiding the things that can upset your dog is sometimes the best option for everyone to have an enjoyable time.

5 French Bulldog Facts You Should Know


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What has big bat ears, a small body and a smushy, wrinkly face? That’s the French Bulldog, #14 on our list of most popular dog breeds! It’s not a surprise that the Frenchie is playful and energetic, but there are other facts about this trendy breed that might surprise you.

1. One is an award-winning actress.
In ABC’s Modern Family, Jay and Gloria own a French Bulldog named Stella. Brigitte, the dog who plays Stella, is the first French Bulldog to win a Golden Collar award. She beat out dog performers from Chelsea Lately, Hot in Cleveland, Entourage, and Suburgatory. She also beat out the only human competitor, Jason Gann, the star of Wilfred.

2. They’re not from France.

Despite their name, Frenchies are not originally from France—they come from England. Unsurprisingly, the ancestor of the French Bulldog is the English Bulldog. However, the breed’s popularity in France grew once Englishmen brought the dog there during the Industrial Revolution.

3. They like to be heard.

Frenchies aren’t big barkers, but they’ll make a range of other sounds to get your attention. They like to “talk” and might even “sing” along with you to a song. It’s a unique part of their endearing personality.

4. They’re adored by celebrities.

As the popularity of French Bulldogs rises, so does the number of celebrities who own them. Some famous owners of the Frenchie include Victoria Beckham, Lady GaGa, and Leonardo DiCaprio.

5. Their ears sparked debate.

Like their relative the English Bulldog, Frenchies originally had the same “rose-shaped” ear, but American breeders preferred the distinct bat-shape. American fanciers remained adamant in that the breed standard of the dog should have bat ears, forming the French Bulldog Club of America in order to reinforce this rule.

What do you think is the best feature of the Frenchie? Tell us below!

7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Boxer


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Built like athletes, Boxers are a sporty dog breed that is both easily-trained and friendly with others. For all Boxers have to offer, they’ve made it onto our list of most popular dog breeds at #11! Learn more about these popular family dogs with our 7 things you need to know about Boxers!

1. They’ve got a youthful spirit.
While some dogs are considered mature at one year old, others, like the Boxer, maintain their endearing puppy-like nature for a longer period. Because Boxers are not considered fully mature until the age of three, these playful and energetic pups are sometimes called the “Peter Pan” of dog breeds, with one of the longest puppyhoods of all dogs.

2. They got their name for a reason.

Boxers got their name because of their funny poses. They have a tendency to stand on their hind legs and “box” with their front paws in play. They’re real athletes!

3. They were one of the first German police dogs.

Bred for their high intelligence and ability to follow orders, it’s no wonder why the Boxer was one of Germany’s first dogs to be used in police training. They went on to serve as military dogs during WWI.

4. They’re related to another popular pup.

The Boxer is the cousin to nearly all Bulldog-type breeds. These dogs descend from the ancient Molosser line of dog breeds.

5. They have long tongues!

Boxers tend to have longer tongues than other dog breeds. The world record for the “Longest Tongue on a Dog” went to a Boxer named Brandy, whose licker was a full 17 inches long!

6. They have a distinctive look.
The Boxer’s square jaw is called an “undershot,” named for how the lower jaw protrudes beyond the upper and curves slightly upward. This unique dental feature gives Boxers their distinctive smiles!

7. They’re multitalented.

While these dogs were bred to be hunters, Boxers also excel in the show ring and other areas. While originally a member of the Working dog group, in 2012 the AKC changed its rules to allow Boxers eligibility for herding titles. They also do well in agility, obedience and tracking.

Which of these facts were surprising to you? Comment below and share with us! 

6 Things You Didn’t Know About the Bulldog


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Bulldogs are a fan-favorite for many reasons. Their wrinkly faces, bodily folds and endearing personalities continue to charm Americans, landing them the #16 spot on PuppySpot’s list of most popular dog breeds! Learn more about the adorable Bulldog with these 6 need-to-know facts!

1. They have a not-so-proud history.
The Bulldog’s name comes from its history in bullbaiting, a popular sport in 19th century England which was later banned under the Cruelty of Animal Act of 1835.

2. They have easy-to-care-for coats.
Because of their short hair, grooming Bulldogs is fairly easy. In fact, they only need to be bathed once or twice a year!

3. They have a little in common with a British Prime Minister.

Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was nicknamed the “British Bulldog” because of his looks and demeanor. He was not an owner of the dog, however.

4. They’re popular mascots.

While the Bulldog became a mascot for the U.S. military during the 60’s, they’re also a popular choice for about 40 universities across the country. While gentle-natured pets, the intimidating features they were originally bred for give a threatening impression of the sports teams they represent.

5. They run Los Angeles.
Bulldogs are a popular breed choice for the rich and famous. Some well-known celebrity Bulldog owners include Leonardo DiCaprio, Reese Witherspoon, David Beckham, Martha Stewart and Zac Efron.

6. They can be surprisingly sporty.
Bulldogs are known for being couch potatoes, but they can be trained to ride skateboards quite well! One Bulldog named Otto broke the Guinness World Record for “Longest Human Tunnel Traveled Through by a Skateboarding Dog” in 2015 by skating under the legs of 30 people in Lima, Peru.

Are you a Bulldog fan? Tell us why you love the amusing animals in the comments section, below!

The Dark Truth About Smoking Around Your Dog


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We all know smoking around others can be detrimental to even a non-smoker’s health, but what about smoking around your dog? You may have seen the recent anti-smoking campaign by Truth which condemns smoking around pets, warning, “Fact: Dogs and cats are twice as likely to get cancer if their owner smokes.” Cancer is the last thing we want for precious Fido, so let’s examine the consequences of this common, yet dangerous habit on our furry friends.

According to petMD, dogs living with smoking owners are more likely than dogs with non-smoking owners to develop lung cancer and respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchitis. In addition, the type of snout your dog has will determine how secondhand smoke affects him. Research shows that while the chemicals found in cigarettes can more readily reach the lungs of dogs with shorter noses (such as Pugs, Bulldogs and Boston Terriers), these toxins cause an increased risk of cancer by 250% in long-nosed dogs (such as Dachshunds and Collies) due to the chronic buildup of carcinogens in their nasal passages.

Assistant Professor Heather Wilson-Robles at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Science (CVM) describes the symptoms of pets with lung diseases, including: dry hacking, progressive cough, or harder-to-manage asthma symptoms. She also notes that accidental ingestion of tobacco products can result in “gastrointestinal upset such as vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased salivation and trembling.”

Wilson-Robles recommends that while the best way to avoid smoking-related health issues in pets is to quit smoking altogether, there are other courses of action that smokers can take to lessen the harm on their four-legged friends. First, dog-owning smokers should immediately cease smoking directly around their dog. And, after smoking, owners should wash their hands completely before handling their dog or any item with which the dog may come into contact.

Lastly, if a dog accidentally eats a disposed tobacco product, the owner should call an emergency clinic immediately as they will medically induce vomiting in the case the dog does not vomit up the product on his own. Some signs of nicotine poisoning in dogs include tremors, twitching, or seizures; drooling; constricted pupils; auditory and visual hallucinations; excitement, racing heart; and vomiting and diarrhea.

As with nicotine, marijuana can also affect dogs differently than it affects humans. Dogs can get high from second-hand marijuana smoke, ingesting edibles or by eating parts of the marijuana plant. According to caninejournal.com,  the effects of marijuana on dogs include lethargy, breathing problems, lower blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, loss of balance and incontinence. While recreational marijuana continues to gain legality in some states, marijuana is not yet approved for canine use and should not be given to your dog.

Just as important it is to look out for one’s own pet’s health, it is likewise necessary to be mindful of one’s behavior around other animals. Smokers should abide by proper smoking etiquette while in public; if you wouldn’t smoke near a child or your own dog, don’t smoke right next to someone else’s pet. Similarly, non-smoking dog-owners should take the proper precautions to avoid coming into contact with smokers and their byproducts, as well as to keep a watchful eye on what their dog digs its nose into outside of the house.

Everyone is well-aware of the dangers of smoking, but your canine’s health and well-being may just be one more reason to quit the habit. At the very least, dog-owners should be aware of the effects and take measures to keep smoking limited to a private space, away from their beloved animals.

Check Out These 7 St. Patrick’s Day Puppies!


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On St. Patrick’s Day, we wear green, talk like leprechauns and bet on our luck. These 7 cute PuppySpot pups are in the St. Patty’s sprit!

Churchill the Bulldog dons a leprechaun hat today.

Dylam the Havanese is looking for a four-leaf clover.

This Pomeranian named Coco Bear wonders if she’ll find the pot of gold under a rainbow today.

Patty the Rottweiler celebrates St. Patty’s in style.

This Maltese named Giovani is waist-deep in Irish ale.

Molly the Lab won’t get caught getting pinched this year!

Lucky #7 is Ruthy the German Shepherd!

 

Brachycephalic Dogs: The Truth About Those Adorable, Pushed-In Little Noses


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The first thing you probably notice when you see a pug, boxer, or bulldog is that cute, wrinkly, smooshed-in face (Who can resist those velvety folds?). But underneath those wrinkles is a medical condition to be aware of, which can negatively impact a dog’s quality of life. If you have a dog or are thinking about getting a dog with a “snub nose,” here’s what you need to know in order to keep him as comfortable and healthy as possible.

Breeds with flat noses have a condition called “brachycephalic syndrome.” The term brachycephalic refers to a broad, short skull shape that gives certain breeds a distinct snub-nosed appearance. While it’s typically easy to spot a brachycephalic dog based on physical appearance, there are varying degrees of severity. Here is a complete list of brachycephalic breeds:

Because Brachycephalic dogs have a structural narrowing at the nostrils, the back of the throat, and in the windpipe, most dogs with the condition prefer to breathe through their mouths due to the increased airway resistance in their noses. Mildly affected dogs will breathe noisily, snort when excited and snore while sleeping. Depending on the severity of the symptoms, your pup may become distressed, especially after exercise or in warmer temperatures. On very hot days, brachycephalic dogs run a high risk of heat stroke because of their difficulty regulating body temperature.

In addition to breathing loudly, snorting, and snoring, there are a few other signs of distress to watch out for, including retching or gagging, especially while swallowing, which indicates an elongated soft palate and is a sign of trouble. Dogs with elongated soft palates often prefer to sleep on their backs because it makes breathing easier. Watch out for blue gums, blue tongue or fainting after exercise; in extreme cases, this can indicate lack of oxygen in your pup’s blood. Take a look at your dog’s nostrils, too – do they look normal, or do they appear to be pinched closed? Nostrils that are closed too far to allow for proper air flow are a part of the brachycephalic syndrome, and are called “stenotic nares.” While this condition is present from birth, it may not affect your dog until later in life, so even if your dog does not currently show symptoms, it’s important to continue to monitor your brachycephalic dog closely.

Treatment Options

  • Check in with your vet regularly and keep tabs on the condition. Not all dogs require surgery to be comfortable, but many benefit from corrective procedures if preventative measures are not enough to provide your pup relief.
  • Learn what’s normal for your pooch. Once you figure out which snorts and snores are status quo, you’ll know immediately when you hear troubling breathing sounds or a new type of snorting that it’s time to visit your vet.
  • Maintain a healthy weight for your pup. Obesity can make breathing problems worse.
  • Always regulate your dog’s temperature and exercise, especially during the summer months. As mentioned, hot and humid weather increases a brachycephalic dog’s risk of heat stroke, so make sure he stays cool.
  •  Consider using a harness instead of a collar. A collar can pull on your dog’s larynx, making breathing even more difficult.
  • Sometimes, surgery is necessary to allow your dog to breathe normally and improve his quality of life. The soft palate can be surgically trimmed shorter, stenotic nares can be widened, and both are simple, minimally invasive procedures.
  •  Lastly, consider spaying or neutering. Since this condition is inherited, it’s a good idea to avoid breeding a dog that suffers from severe brachycephalic syndrome. Use your vet as a resource, stay informed on new treatment options and do your part to keep your wrinkly-faced pooch safe.

9 Pups Who Prove Smiling is Contagious


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It’s been proven that smiling is contagious and that your pooch can recognize human emotion on faces. We dare you to look at these pleased pups and not reciprocate their cheerful dispositions.

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This Shipoo is delighted to see you.

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This Bulldog wants a high-five.

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This Springer Spaniel is pleased as punch.

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This Husky is drunk with laughter.

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This German Shepherd wants you to THROW THE BALL ALREADY.

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This Pomeranian has never been happier to go for a ride in the car.

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This Shar-Pei is relieved to take a nap.

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This Shichon is takes “Tongue Out Tuesday” very seriously.

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This Corgi is ready for his close-up.

The 411 on Hot Spots


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Does your dog itch, scratch and lick himself so often in certain places that the affected areas become red, hot, irritated, or even bloody and scabbed? This ailment, also known as “hot spots” or “moist eczema,” is caused by a variety of factors such as bites, poor grooming, skin infections, stress or boredom, but is quite often the result of environmental allergies.

Allergens in the air such as dust or pollen often consistent with a change in seasons, increase a dog’s histamine levels, which set off uncomfortable itching that the dog tries to self-remedy by scratching, licking and biting. Not to be ignored, environmental allergies, also known as “atopic dermatitis” typically occur post puppy-hood after a dog is one years old, and become progressively worse over a dog’s lifespan.

Hot spots can not only be quite painful and irritating for dogs, but are also upsetting for the owner who has to watch and listen to a dog licking, scratching and inflicting self-trauma. Hot spots can severely affect the quality of the dog’s life and if left untreated, the hot spots will only worsen and develop into bacterial infection sites due to the combination of an open wound and surrounding moistness.

Certain breeds are more susceptible to hot spots, including Retrievers, Terriers, Boxers, Dalmatians, Bulldogs, Shepherds, Beagles and Irish Setters.

Medication Treatments for Relief:

Antihistamine Medication – Similar to treatment offered to humans who suffer from allergies, an antihistamine such as Benadryl or Claritin can be helpful as a first line of defense, at least for temporary relief. Remember to consult with your vet regarding the appropriate dosage for your dog based on weight. Unfortunately, these medications can often lose effectiveness if used too often and only work on 30% of dogs.

Steroid Medication – The next option, if an antihistamine isn’t doing the trick, is to discuss corticosteroid medications with your vet. A stronger Rx, these meds are often effective, but you must be careful with continued use, as they can present possible severe and permanent side effects.

Immunotherapy – Many veterinarians will say allergy shots are the only effective method to stop the progression of allergies. Similar to the skin testing performed on humans, a veterinarian will inject various allergens into the dog’s skin to test which cause reactions, and to which degree. The allergens are then mixed together to formulate the injection, which over time and if performed consistently, will desensitize your dog’s immune system. It’s recommended to start young as the older the dog gets, the less effective the treatment can be.

Immune-Suppressants – This option should only be explored if immunotherapy is not showing positive results or improvement. Immune modulator drugs suppress the immune system so that it does not respond to harmless allergens. However, these medications can cause side effects such as vomiting and diarrhea, and present an increased risk of infection from other illnesses.

Sublingual Immunotherapy – This is an alternative to allergy shots, if you’re concerned your dog may have a negative or aggressive reaction to an injection. With this treatment, the medication is administered by squeezing into their mouth.

Please know that each option should be thoroughly discussed and weighed with your veterinarian as treatments will vary based on the dog’s breed, size, and medical history.

Non-Medication Treatments for Relief:

Keep Your Dog’s Paws Clean – As a preventative measure, it doesn’t hurt to manually remove potential allergens from your dog’s paws after walks or hikes by washing or wiping thoroughly.

Use Medicated Shampoo – For bathing, ask your vet dermatologist for a recommendation on a specially-formulated shampoo designed to control inflammation on skin.

Try Supplements – Certain dietary pills with fatty acids such as biotin and Omega-3s are supposed to suppress itching and improve coat health.

Avoid Products with Known Allergens – If you’ve done a skin testing for your dog and are able to isolate certain allergens, take care with buying food or skincare free of those allergens.

Bathe Often and Follow Flea Control Regimen – A regularly groomed dog taking consistent flea prevention medication will have less risk of fleas and other irritants, which can cause hot spots.

Offer A Stress-Free Environment – Make sure your dog gets regular exercise and opportunities for play to relieve boredom.

Use a Temporary E-collar – While annoying for your dog, an Elizabethan collar or cone can be effective for stopping the itching and allowing the hot spot to heal.

Fido, the Petsetter: Air Travel Safety


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Flying your dog on an airplane can seem worrisome, but rest assured that hundreds of thousands of pets fly every year, and the number of pet-related incidents is extremely low relative to the large amount of pets traveling in the great blue sky. Whether flying in-cabin as carry-on or flying in cargo (both safe and comfortable options), we’ve outlined the key steps you can take for safely and responsibly flying your dog. Follow these tips and feel good about bringing your pup on that next vacation.

Get Your Pup Accustomed To The Crate
Every pup that goes on an airplane (whether as carry-on or cargo) is required to be contained within an appropriately-sized kennel. For this reason, it’s important to acclimate your dog to the crate well in advance of her trip. To ease the stress associated with being confined to a small space for a period of time, purchase the kennel as far in advance of your trip as possible and follow the rules of crate training such as leaving the door open and encouraging entry with a chew toy or treat in order to get your pup as used to the crate as possible. Also, be sure to pay attention to your airline’s specific rules for kennels (each varies slightly). For example, United has a page dedicated to kennel guidelines. You don’t want any surprises at check-in!

Do Not Sedate Your Pup Under Any Circumstance
Even the pet owner with the best intentions may think giving their pup something to “take the edge off” is a good idea. Please stand corrected. Under no circumstance is it advised to sedate or tranquilize your pup for air travel. In fact, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) states that sedating pets for air travel can be fatal. Sedation is the most frequent cause of animal incidents during transport as many animals react negatively/abnormally to sedation and not much is known about the side effects of sedatives combined with high altitude and/or higher stress levels.

Make Sure Your Dog is Healthy Enough To Fly
A dog with known health issues or of senior age is more likely to respond negatively to the stress induced by flying and is at greater risk for injury. In fact, many airlines such as Delta require a health certificate within 10 days of departure before agreeing to ship a pet as cargo and have age limitations on flying pets. Not only is it often required, but it’s wise as a responsible pet owner to get your dog checked out by a licensed veterinarian and current on all vaccinations prior to travel. That’s why at PuppySpot, before any puppy ships home, we require our breeders to have a vet perform a comprehensive, nose-to-tail health exam.

Feed and Exercise Appropriately Prior To Travel
Experts advise to feed your dog approximately 4-6 hours prior to flight time, so he has enough time to digest properly and is full enough for the duration of the flight. Feeding too much and too close to the flight could cause an upset stomach while in-flight. That said, you should continue to keep your dog well-hydrated and provide water right up to the time of travel. Just be sure to empty the dish before checking the dog. A full water bowl will spill or cause unnecessary messes and excessive urination during flight. Before heading to the airport, be sure to exercise your dog with a long walk and allow her plenty of pees and poops before takeoff. Plenty of exercise will afford your dog the opportunity to burn off excess energy and therefore, rest easier during the flight.

Stay Calm and Give Your Pup The Comforts of Home
Remember, your dog feeds off of your energy. So, if you’re positive and carefree about the experience, those feelings will rub off on him and put him more at ease. To give him some extra comfort during the flight, as long as rules allow, include a familiar toy or blanket with the smells from home inside his carrier. Before he knows it, he’ll have arrived safely at his destination and be reunited with (or meet) his loving owner.

Avoid Travel in Summer and Winter Seasons
All major airlines have strict weather restrictions when it comes to flying pets, as animals can be extra sensitive to extreme heat or cold. So, to avoid any surprises, use your best judgement when booking and do not arrange travel in the dead of summer or winter to or from places that experience extreme weather conditions, as your dog will be unable to fly in very high or very low temperatures.

Be Aware of Breed Restrictions
If you own a snub-nosed breed such as a Pug, Bulldog or Boxer, you may not be able to fly your pooch on certain airlines. Due to the respiratory difficulties that some of these breeds experience due to the anatomy of their noses, some airlines such as Delta do not allow these breeds on their planes. Do your research ahead of time and make sure your chosen airline is the right fit for your dog.

The Early Pooch Gets The Worm
You know the old standard of arriving at the airport two hours ahead of your flight to leave enough time for security, checking baggage, etc.? Well the same, if not more of a conservative estimate applies to doggie travel. You don’t want to add to what can already be an anxiety-inducing experience by being late. Give you and your pup plenty of time to get situated and address any issues with TSA well ahead of departure.

With these guidelines, we hope you feel comfortable and confident in flying your pet. Plus, all major airlines offer additional measures to give you that extra peace of mind. For example, United’s PetSafe Program provides the ability to track your pets from origin to destination. And Delta‘s Variation Live Program offers temperature-controlled vans and holding areas as well as specially trained ground handlers for personalized care on the go.

And if you need someone to walk you through the pet travel process, PuppySpot prides itself on its best-in-class travel team, who will assist you with any questions or concerns you may have about your puppy flying home safe and sound.

Dog Breeds by Fur: Low to High Maintenance Pooches


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When deciding on the best dog for your family, grooming responsibilities probably don’t top of the list of criteria during breed selection. However, depending on your financial situation and time constraints, hair may be a factor worth considering. Depending on the type of dog and their grooming needs, you could be visiting a professional groomer as much as every two-four weeks, or at a minimum, intensively brushing at home on a daily basis. Here’s a rundown of the lowest to highest maintenance pups when it comes to hair, which should help with setting expectations, planning and budgeting.

Short-haired, smaller dogs are going to require the least amount of grooming. An important caveat however is that even though these breeds are short-haired, they will still shed somewhat as all dogs shed some fur. Check out these breeds with low grooming needs if you’d rather not trade in your day job for a styling gig.

Italian Greyhound
Boston Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
• Harrier
Dalmation
• Whippet
• German Pinscher
• Basenji
• Australian Kelpie
Weimaraner
Vizsla
• English Foxhound
Boxer
Rottweiler
• Black & Tan Coonhound
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Mastiff
Great Dane
Bloodhound
• Neapolitan Mastiff

talk-ab-fur-thumbnailConversely, if you can’t resist a fluffy, long-haired pup, target this list of styling breeds, who require more hands-on attention to their coats to avoid matting, shedding and hygiene issues.

Akita
Alaskan Malamute
• Bearded Collie
Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise
• Border Terrier (or most terriers, for that matter)
Bulldog
Chow Chow
Cockapoo
Cocker Spaniel (and most other Spaniels)
Collie
• English or Irish Setter
• Giant, Standard and Miniature Schnauzers
Havanese
Lhasa Apso
Maltipoo
Old English Sheepdog (and other sheep dogs)
• Pekingese
Pomeranian
Poodle
Portuguese Water Dog
Shih Tzu
Siberian Husky

Hold The Elevator: Best Dogs For Apartment Living


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While any dog can thrive in an apartment setting if given the right amount of exercise, there are certain breeds considered ideal housemates in smaller living spaces. As a general rule of thumb, if a dog can fit in your purse, it can fit in your apartment – but there are exceptions! Some small breeds have high energy levels, and would do best with more room to run and play. On the other hand, some larger breeds are low energy and wouldn’t mind living in an apartment with less space. So, with a grain of salt, take a look at these perfect apartment-dwelling breeds based on size, energy level and personality.

Yorkie – The ever-popular Yorkie is cute, cuddly and compact – what more could you ask for? These small, affectionate dogs are keen to be near their owners, typically only weigh between 5-7 pounds, and are easily exercised indoors.

MalteseMaltese are adorable, gentle companions. They are the quintessential lap dog and love to be pampered, cuddled and held. These 4-7 pound dogs are also easy to train, and don’t have high exercise requirements, making them excellent apartment residents.

Havanese – These small dogs have big personalities! Eager to learn and easily trained, Havanese are between 10-15 pounds when fully grown, and make excellent companion pets. They are playful and somewhat active, but are easily manageable in an apartment.

PugPugs have an amusing, distinctive appearance and are generally considered to be a very adaptable breed. They are loyal, quiet dogs that love to be with their owners and have low exercise requirements, making them a good pet for living spaces of any size.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – These dogs want nothing more than to be by your side! Fairly small at 13-18 pounds, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is friendly and easy going, and will get along with anyone. They excel in smaller living spaces because of their calm and adaptable nature.

Bichon Frise – This fancy, fluffy pup is energetic, but can be exercised easily indoors as well as out. At only 7-12 pounds., the Bichon makes a quiet, loving apartment dog – and bonus, they shed much less than other breeds, ideal for living in close quarters!

Bulldog (French and English) – Both French and English Bulldogs tend to be low energy, content to laze around and be by your side, which make them great apartment pets. These dogs thrive on human contact and make great watchdogs. Plus, have you seen those adorable wrinkly faces…?

Shih Tzu – Bred to be a friendly lap dog, the Shih Tzu is certainly good at its job! They are affectionate, mellow and adaptable to any living environment.

hold-elevator-thumbnailBoston Terrier – Ideal because of their size, this breed is fairly energetic and will need to be walked daily. But, if you can keep a Boston Terrier well-exercised, these little gentlemen and ladies make devoted, gentle apartment pets.

Dachshund – These distinctive dogs have short legs, long bodies, and big hearts. They are lively dogs that love to exercise indoors and out. Dachshunds tend to attach strongly to their owners and are extremely affectionate, making them great roommates.

ChihuahuaChihuahuas are tiny and love to cuddle – especially in the cold winter months, as they can be sensitive to low temperatures. They require minimal exercise, but are fun and playful when you want to be active. These little guys and girls make excellent apartment dogs!

Pomeranian – This little fluff ball is feisty and full of energy, but at only 3-7 pounds, they don’t need much room to get their exercise! The Pomeranian is affectionate and outgoing and will take comfort in curling up next to you, no matter how small your apartment.

Great Dane – So, a Great Dane might not seem like the best option for an apartment based on his size – anywhere from 100-200 pounds as adults – but these big guys are actually very low energy and are content to lay on the couch right next to you. As quiet and friendly as they are, this breed would make an excellent apartment roommate!