Tag Archives: dog breeder

Tax Day: 5 Surprising Dog-Related Write-Offs


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Most people dread tax season, full of paperwork and potential money owed. While the majority of pet costs (veterinary, food, grooming, or boarding bills) are not eligible for tax deductions, there are a few exceptions for qualified dog owners. We’ve broken out several IRS-approved dog expenses, which may be considered eligible tax deductions. Keep the following tax-friendly dog scenarios in mind for next year’s filing!

1. Moving Costs
If you’re moving residences and unable to take your dog with you, consider using a professional transportation company to handle the hassle of shipping your dog cross-country. Pet relocation costs are considered above-the-line deductions. The IRS simply requires a filled out worksheet and Forms 1040 and 3903 to complete the claim. The extra work is sure to be worth the savings.

2. Guide, Service or Therapy Dogs
The IRS says that if a guide dog is needed to assist the hearing or visually-impaired, you can write off all costs-associated with the dog’s care, such as the dog’s actual purchase, training, food, grooming and of course, medical expenses. A good rule of thumb is that any expense necessary to keeping the dog healthy enough to perform his service-related responsibilities, may be written off. Similarly, if you have a therapy dog trained or certified to help with treatment of a physical or mental health condition, all costs associated with the dog are approved as medical-related expenses.

3. Working Guard Dogs
If your dog is necessary to your line of work (for example, your Rottweiler or German Shepherd guards your storefront or warehouse inventory), then you may write off the dog’s expenses related to the job. Standard business deduction rules such as keeping track of the hours your dog spends on the job would apply to this scenario. However, as long as you can prove that the money spent on your dog (e.g., food, medical, training) is required to keep him up to guard dog condition and that his presence is necessary to maintaining your livelihood, these costs would qualify as business expenses.

4. Dog Breeders
As an animal breeder, your breeding stock is an essential part of your business and thus you’re allowed to deduct all necessary animal-related expenses from your taxes. The IRS allows you to claim animals held for breeding of at least 12 months as either capital assets or as a part of your regular inventory. By claiming your breeding stock as capital gains, this allows you to depreciate them and ultimately reduces your taxable income. Make sure to use all of the right forms when filing your income taxes and reporting all sales to get all the breaks you’re entitled to.

5. Charitable Donations, Fostering Animals or Regular Volunteer Work
If your love for dogs involves continuous and regular philanthropic work, you could be eligible for related tax write-offs. Perhaps you routinely donate to an animal rescue organization or volunteer at a local shelter. Or, you foster pets for a temporary period of time until they are adopted into permanent homes. Be sure to retain all receipts and records associated with pro-social work and foster pets and be sure to itemize deductions under the charity section of Schedule A.

6. Canine Sports Leaders
Does your dog compete in professional dog shows? If you participate in dog competitions, agility meets or a canine-related income-generating hobby, such as selling portraits of your dog, or lecturing on dog-related topics, unfortunately the income is taxable. However, you may use the hobby’s expenses as write-offs, to offset the hobby’s earnings. Hobby expenses can be itemized under Schedule A, but the total must exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income before it can be deductible. Note that if the pet-related hobby starts to generate income on a regular basis, you should consider turning it into a business, where you could write off even more expenses.

7. Pet Trusts
Not surprisingly to most dog lovers, it’s become accepted practice to include beloved animals in wills and trusts to ensure that whomever takes possession of the pet after death will receive adequate income to pay for the pet’s expenses. Depending on the structure of the trust, dog owners can work with their attorneys to make sure taxes are paid from the trust itself without adding to the beneficiary’s tax liability.

How to Find a Responsible Breeder


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Congratulations! You’ve made the big, meaningful decision to get a dog. You’re ready to experience all the love a puppy brings to a home and with your mind now made up, the excitement is building and you’re anxious to find “The One.”

Having placed tens of thousands of dogs into loving homes, we are proud of both our expertise in selecting the top breeders in the country (we accept less than 10% of applicants into our network) and our commitment to matching well-qualified puppy parents to be with the right dogs for them and their families.

Over the years, we’ve talked to countless dog owners, breeders and puppy parents-to-be, and our goal has always been to help make the process of finding a dog easy and safe, while making the transition for the puppies and new owners as seamless as possible. Through our experience, we’ve learned the keys to responsibly finding a dog and want to share them with you.

buy-responsibly-thumbnailTo empower you and start you off on the right foot as a puppy parent-to-be, we’ve broken down the top 10 questions to ask your puppy source. By doing your due diligence with the necessary research, you’ll be able to make an informed, educated choice, thereby ensuring your puppy’s optimal well-being, health and happiness.

1. Where did the puppy come from?
It’s crucial to fully know and understand your puppy’s history – birth place, parents, lineage, characteristics, any known health issues, current state of care, any former owners, etc.

2. If selecting from a breeder, is the breeder USDA licensed or legally exempt from licensing?
Fortunately, the breeding industry is regulated by the Federal government, and licensed breeders are required to follow strict standards on cleanliness, protocol and humane treatment of all animals on the premises.

3. Does a veterinarian examine the puppies before they’re released to the puppy owner?
Because your puppy’s health is of utmost importance, it’s imperative to make sure a licensed veterinarian has done a nose-to-tail examination of the puppy and has written up a comprehensive report so you’re aware of and adequately prepared for any issues before choosing your puppy.

4. Is the puppy up-to-date on all vaccinations?
Make sure to obtain records of vaccinations to ensure the puppy is current on all the necessary immunizations for his/her age. Vaccines are essential to protect against potentially life-threatening illnesses.

5. Has the puppy been socialized with other puppies, dogs and people?
You’ll want to make sure the puppy has had regular interaction with not just other puppies in its litter, but also other adult dogs and of course, people. You’ll want to have a full assessment of any socialization or behavioral issues before deciding whether the dog is right for you and/or your family.

6. Do you offer a guarantee on the dog’s health?
Unfortunately, even the most well taken care of dogs can sometimes get sick. Because life happens, it’s important to be realistic and ask if your puppy source offers any sort of health guarantee or reimbursement, should you discover your puppy has a genetic or hereditary illness or contracts a disease within a certain period of time.

7. Can I see photos and video of the puppies and/or litters available?
A reputable breeder will not only answer any and all questions you may have, but will also happily send photos and/or videos of the puppies you’re interested in so you can not only see what they look like, but also observe their behavior and temperament. Because geographical limitations often prevent the ability to visit a facility in person, photos and videos are great ways to learn more about the puppies, parents and breeder.

8. What paperwork has already been filed, and what documentation will I receive with the puppy?
Find out if the puppy has already been registered and has the required certification. Some breeders will handle, while others require the prospective puppy owner to complete the process. You’ll want to be aware of what paperwork (if any) lies within your responsibility. In addition, many breeders will offer proof of genetic testing for the sire and dam (parents) of the puppy.

9. What is the breeder’s experience and background?
It is your right to learn about the breeder you’re choosing from – not just how they run their operation, but also their expertise and history with dog breeding. Besides amount of years breeding, you may want to ask if the breeder belongs to any breed organizations or clubs, what criteria they require of their stock, and simply, why they breed dogs. The love and passion for what they do will come through in their responses. You should also ask who you should reach out to with any issues after the sale. A good breeder will check in periodically after puppy arrives home.

10. Is there a contract? If so, what are the terms and guarantees?
Similar to the health guarantee mentioned above, understand the inclusions and limitations of your agreement, which can include anything and everything from spaying and neutering to re-homing provisions.