Tag Archives: Lhasa Apso

These 10 PuppySpot Puppies Would Like to Wish You a Happy Easter


Warning: sprintf() expects at least 1 parameter, 0 given in /home/wp_r3zcif/puppyspotcontent.com/content/wp-content/themes/Purebred-Breeders/content.php on line 69

Easter Sunday is a time for family to get together, have egg hunts and celebrate rebirth in spring. And when puppies get involved, it makes the holiday all the more enjoyable! Check out these 10 fun and festive PuppySpot puppies celebrating Easter!

This Havanese pup named Hudson looks picture-pawfect in a festive egg frame.

Naomi the Frenchie is getting comfortable in the Easter Bunny’s nest.

Laura the Lhasa Apso has rounded up her loot from the egg hunt!

This Bichon Frise named Brody has a gift basket to share with you.

This Cavalier pup named Buddy poses adorably beside his own basket of Easter eggs.

This German Shepherd pup named Rilie walks with a bunny on each arm.

Tucker the Cockapoo stands out from his pastel surroundings.

Peter the Pug has lots of Easter toys to play with (and doesn’t want to share).

This Mini Pinscher pup named Anna loves this blooming time of year.

Last but not least, this Havanese pup named Maggie wants to wish you a Happy Easter!

Brachycephalic Dogs: The Truth About Those Adorable, Pushed-In Little Noses


Warning: sprintf() expects at least 1 parameter, 0 given in /home/wp_r3zcif/puppyspotcontent.com/content/wp-content/themes/Purebred-Breeders/content.php on line 69

The first thing you probably notice when you see a pug, boxer, or bulldog is that cute, wrinkly, smooshed-in face (Who can resist those velvety folds?). But underneath those wrinkles is a medical condition to be aware of, which can negatively impact a dog’s quality of life. If you have a dog or are thinking about getting a dog with a “snub nose,” here’s what you need to know in order to keep him as comfortable and healthy as possible.

Breeds with flat noses have a condition called “brachycephalic syndrome.” The term brachycephalic refers to a broad, short skull shape that gives certain breeds a distinct snub-nosed appearance. While it’s typically easy to spot a brachycephalic dog based on physical appearance, there are varying degrees of severity. Here is a complete list of brachycephalic breeds:

Because Brachycephalic dogs have a structural narrowing at the nostrils, the back of the throat, and in the windpipe, most dogs with the condition prefer to breathe through their mouths due to the increased airway resistance in their noses. Mildly affected dogs will breathe noisily, snort when excited and snore while sleeping. Depending on the severity of the symptoms, your pup may become distressed, especially after exercise or in warmer temperatures. On very hot days, brachycephalic dogs run a high risk of heat stroke because of their difficulty regulating body temperature.

In addition to breathing loudly, snorting, and snoring, there are a few other signs of distress to watch out for, including retching or gagging, especially while swallowing, which indicates an elongated soft palate and is a sign of trouble. Dogs with elongated soft palates often prefer to sleep on their backs because it makes breathing easier. Watch out for blue gums, blue tongue or fainting after exercise; in extreme cases, this can indicate lack of oxygen in your pup’s blood. Take a look at your dog’s nostrils, too – do they look normal, or do they appear to be pinched closed? Nostrils that are closed too far to allow for proper air flow are a part of the brachycephalic syndrome, and are called “stenotic nares.” While this condition is present from birth, it may not affect your dog until later in life, so even if your dog does not currently show symptoms, it’s important to continue to monitor your brachycephalic dog closely.

Treatment Options

  • Check in with your vet regularly and keep tabs on the condition. Not all dogs require surgery to be comfortable, but many benefit from corrective procedures if preventative measures are not enough to provide your pup relief.
  • Learn what’s normal for your pooch. Once you figure out which snorts and snores are status quo, you’ll know immediately when you hear troubling breathing sounds or a new type of snorting that it’s time to visit your vet.
  • Maintain a healthy weight for your pup. Obesity can make breathing problems worse.
  • Always regulate your dog’s temperature and exercise, especially during the summer months. As mentioned, hot and humid weather increases a brachycephalic dog’s risk of heat stroke, so make sure he stays cool.
  •  Consider using a harness instead of a collar. A collar can pull on your dog’s larynx, making breathing even more difficult.
  • Sometimes, surgery is necessary to allow your dog to breathe normally and improve his quality of life. The soft palate can be surgically trimmed shorter, stenotic nares can be widened, and both are simple, minimally invasive procedures.
  •  Lastly, consider spaying or neutering. Since this condition is inherited, it’s a good idea to avoid breeding a dog that suffers from severe brachycephalic syndrome. Use your vet as a resource, stay informed on new treatment options and do your part to keep your wrinkly-faced pooch safe.

14 Puppies Share the Love this V-Day


Warning: sprintf() expects at least 1 parameter, 0 given in /home/wp_r3zcif/puppyspotcontent.com/content/wp-content/themes/Purebred-Breeders/content.php on line 69

Not only is Valentine’s Day a day for couples, but it’s also a day we appreciate those we love most, including our furry friends! Let’s celebrate this day of love with 14 PuppySpot puppies who have lots of love to share!

Zara the Mini Pinscher has lots of hugs and kisses for you!

This Frenchton puppy named Molly is all dressed up for her special date!

This Havanese pup’s heart is stuffed with puppy love!

Mr. Romeo the Maltese has eyes that stare straight into your soul.

What’s a Romeo without his Juliet?

Orchid the Lhasa Apso shows off new jewelry from her special someone.

Kenzie the Boxer is also rocking some bling!

Cupid the Goldendoodle will shoot an arrow through your crush’s heart!

This Dachshund puppy named Lucas wants to say those three little words!

Oscar the Borkie made sure not to show up without flowers!

Jasmine the French Bulldog wants a kiss on her heart-shaped nose!

This Beagle puppy named Jacie was bitten by the love bug.

Emerald the Cavalier King Charles puppy wants to know if you’ll be his Valentine.

Lastly, what’s Valentine’s Day without a little Love?

Dog Breeds by Fur: Low to High Maintenance Pooches


Warning: sprintf() expects at least 1 parameter, 0 given in /home/wp_r3zcif/puppyspotcontent.com/content/wp-content/themes/Purebred-Breeders/content.php on line 69

When deciding on the best dog for your family, grooming responsibilities probably don’t top of the list of criteria during breed selection. However, depending on your financial situation and time constraints, hair may be a factor worth considering. Depending on the type of dog and their grooming needs, you could be visiting a professional groomer as much as every two-four weeks, or at a minimum, intensively brushing at home on a daily basis. Here’s a rundown of the lowest to highest maintenance pups when it comes to hair, which should help with setting expectations, planning and budgeting.

Short-haired, smaller dogs are going to require the least amount of grooming. An important caveat however is that even though these breeds are short-haired, they will still shed somewhat as all dogs shed some fur. Check out these breeds with low grooming needs if you’d rather not trade in your day job for a styling gig.

Italian Greyhound
Boston Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
• Harrier
Dalmation
• Whippet
• German Pinscher
• Basenji
• Australian Kelpie
Weimaraner
Vizsla
• English Foxhound
Boxer
Rottweiler
• Black & Tan Coonhound
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Mastiff
Great Dane
Bloodhound
• Neapolitan Mastiff

talk-ab-fur-thumbnailConversely, if you can’t resist a fluffy, long-haired pup, target this list of styling breeds, who require more hands-on attention to their coats to avoid matting, shedding and hygiene issues.

Akita
Alaskan Malamute
• Bearded Collie
Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise
• Border Terrier (or most terriers, for that matter)
Bulldog
Chow Chow
Cockapoo
Cocker Spaniel (and most other Spaniels)
Collie
• English or Irish Setter
• Giant, Standard and Miniature Schnauzers
Havanese
Lhasa Apso
Maltipoo
Old English Sheepdog (and other sheep dogs)
• Pekingese
Pomeranian
Poodle
Portuguese Water Dog
Shih Tzu
Siberian Husky