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Brachycephalic Dogs: The Truth About Those Adorable, Pushed-In Little Noses


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The first thing you probably notice when you see a pug, boxer, or bulldog is that cute, wrinkly, smooshed-in face (Who can resist those velvety folds?). But underneath those wrinkles is a medical condition to be aware of, which can negatively impact a dog’s quality of life. If you have a dog or are thinking about getting a dog with a “snub nose,” here’s what you need to know in order to keep him as comfortable and healthy as possible.

Breeds with flat noses have a condition called “brachycephalic syndrome.” The term brachycephalic refers to a broad, short skull shape that gives certain breeds a distinct snub-nosed appearance. While it’s typically easy to spot a brachycephalic dog based on physical appearance, there are varying degrees of severity. Here is a complete list of brachycephalic breeds:

Because Brachycephalic dogs have a structural narrowing at the nostrils, the back of the throat, and in the windpipe, most dogs with the condition prefer to breathe through their mouths due to the increased airway resistance in their noses. Mildly affected dogs will breathe noisily, snort when excited and snore while sleeping. Depending on the severity of the symptoms, your pup may become distressed, especially after exercise or in warmer temperatures. On very hot days, brachycephalic dogs run a high risk of heat stroke because of their difficulty regulating body temperature.

In addition to breathing loudly, snorting, and snoring, there are a few other signs of distress to watch out for, including retching or gagging, especially while swallowing, which indicates an elongated soft palate and is a sign of trouble. Dogs with elongated soft palates often prefer to sleep on their backs because it makes breathing easier. Watch out for blue gums, blue tongue or fainting after exercise; in extreme cases, this can indicate lack of oxygen in your pup’s blood. Take a look at your dog’s nostrils, too – do they look normal, or do they appear to be pinched closed? Nostrils that are closed too far to allow for proper air flow are a part of the brachycephalic syndrome, and are called “stenotic nares.” While this condition is present from birth, it may not affect your dog until later in life, so even if your dog does not currently show symptoms, it’s important to continue to monitor your brachycephalic dog closely.

Treatment Options

  • Check in with your vet regularly and keep tabs on the condition. Not all dogs require surgery to be comfortable, but many benefit from corrective procedures if preventative measures are not enough to provide your pup relief.
  • Learn what’s normal for your pooch. Once you figure out which snorts and snores are status quo, you’ll know immediately when you hear troubling breathing sounds or a new type of snorting that it’s time to visit your vet.
  • Maintain a healthy weight for your pup. Obesity can make breathing problems worse.
  • Always regulate your dog’s temperature and exercise, especially during the summer months. As mentioned, hot and humid weather increases a brachycephalic dog’s risk of heat stroke, so make sure he stays cool.
  •  Consider using a harness instead of a collar. A collar can pull on your dog’s larynx, making breathing even more difficult.
  • Sometimes, surgery is necessary to allow your dog to breathe normally and improve his quality of life. The soft palate can be surgically trimmed shorter, stenotic nares can be widened, and both are simple, minimally invasive procedures.
  •  Lastly, consider spaying or neutering. Since this condition is inherited, it’s a good idea to avoid breeding a dog that suffers from severe brachycephalic syndrome. Use your vet as a resource, stay informed on new treatment options and do your part to keep your wrinkly-faced pooch safe.

Splish Splash: Can Your Pup Do The “Doggie Paddle?”


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Ever imagine your dog running through the ocean waves or swimming alongside you on a hot summer day? You may be in luck. Certain breeds are natural born swimmers. Take a look and see if your pup is ready to get his paws wet.

Golden Retrievers
water-breed-thumbnailThe quintessential water-friendly breed is the Golden Retriever. Early retrievers were crossbred with water spaniels to create the Golden Retriever, which means the breed’s skill for swimming is a biological trait descended down through its ancestry. They’re so suited to water; they even have water-repellent coats!

Irish Water Spaniels
Irish Water Spaniels are one of the most intelligent breeds in the world. The tallest of spaniels, these spunky and lively dogs have curly ringlets, which help form a naturally water-repellent coat. Irish Water Spaniels were trained to hunt for waterfowl, though they enjoy being pets and show dogs, too.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers
These retrievers are the smallest of their kind, but they sure don’t act small! They’re playful, energetic, and exceptionally fast swimmers. They have double coats that naturally repel water, helping them hunt, lure, and retrieve ducks and other waterfowl.

Portuguese Water Hounds
Originally from Algarve, Portugal, the Portuguese Water Hound is quite hard to find as they are a rare breed. These hardworking dogs were given the task of herding fish into nets and then taking them to the shore. The most famous Portuguese Water Hound is our first dog, Bo Obama, son of First Lady and President Barack Obama.

Labrador Retrievers
It’s no surprise that Labrador Retrievers adore water, since they are descendants of St. John’s Water Dogs. They used to help fishermen carry anything from ropes to fishing nets. They’re also very loyal, which makes them excellent companions. Labradors are well loved, ranking as the #1  breed in America, and are routinely used for water rescue missions.

Spanish Water Dogs
Spanish Water dogs are energetic, intelligent, and agile, as they can do anything from hunting to herding. They can be taught a great number of skills, but what they love to do best is engage in water sports.

Newfoundlands
These large dogs were bred to haul fishnets and heavy equipment from the water to the shore. “Newfies” have long coats that are thick, oily and waterproof, making them well-suited for swimming. Plus, their huge lung capacity is an advantage when it comes to swimming long distances.

Poodles
Despite being fluffy and “prissy,” standard poodles are actually excellent gundogs. They’re considered working dogs in the same category as retrievers. Those flamboyant (and sometimes ridiculous) hairdos? Their fur is designed to protect the joints when they dive into cold water. They’re also intelligent and hypoallergenic, making them great family pets.

Chesapeake Bay Retrievers
This large breed is believed to have been sired by two Newfoundlands several generations ago, then crossed with other breeds. Chessies have water-repellent wavy double coats and webbed toes to help them swim! Chessies are intelligent, protective, and very loyal.

English Setters
These setters might look a bit unusual with their speckled or mottled coats, but English Setters are intelligent, sensitive dogs who love the water. Their “belton” coats have many recognized combinations, such as white and black, white and orange, and even some with a tricolor belton of white, black and tan.

Move over Michael Phelps, these aquatic pooches are ready to dive in headfirst!