Tag Archives: parasites

More Than a Hair Cut, Grooming is Health Necessity


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Many dog owners consider grooming their pooch a luxury or vanity service, rather than a health need. Yet, this notion couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s crucial to change this perception as grooming is a necessary in taking care of not just your dog’s look, but also his health and well-being. And so, we’re here to educate dog owners on the following health benefits of regular grooming.

Ear Mites and Ear Infections
Most groomers will closely check your dog’s ears, which are breeding grounds for bacteria, and be able to spot infections or mites, which may otherwise be invisible to the untrained eye of the average dog owner. If infection or mites are found, the groomer may recommend over the counter treatment, or depending on the severity, recommend you see a veterinarian for a prescription.

Fleas, Ticks or Parasites
A professional groomer will check your dog’s body for ticks, fleas and other parasites, which should then be removed meticulously by the groomer. Fleas are typically found while your dog is being bathed in the tub and with a thorough shampoo, most if not all fleas will die in the water.  If the groomer finds ticks however, they are typically removed during the high velocity drying process by splitting the dog’s hair line by line, removing the dead coat and drying the skin row by row. If your groomer finds worms, you’ll be referred to a vet for a checkup. You may want to ask your groomer if they “fluff dry” or “brush dry” to confirm they use either of these thorough techniques.

Abnormal Skin Growths
It’s a good idea to remind your groomer, who is familiar with dog anatomy, to check for skin abnormalities during the grooming process. Because they’re spending a great deal of time on your pup’s hair, skin and body, this is an appropriate time for them to notice any bumps, lumps or abscesses. If these symptoms are identified in the early stages, you can treat your dog before the condition worsens or a serious illness develops.

Nails, Teeth and Sanitary Area
A typical professional dog grooming packaging doesn’t just include a bath and a trim, but also maintenance of other important hygiene areas such as paws, mouth and buttocks. Nail trimming prevents blood vessels from growing too long inside the nail, which could cause problems as your dog gets older. Not to mention, the sound of long nails scratching the floor or furniture can be reason enough alone to get them trimmed regularly! It’s also important for your groomer to trim hair that grows in between the toes, as sometimes burs and tar can get stuck, penetrate the skin and become infected. Regular teeth brushing can also be performed by your groomer, which can help prevent dental disease and bad breath. Lastly, trimming around the sanitary area removes excess hair that’s more prone to hosting bacteria and carrying feces. If your dog is in need of external anal gland expression due to inflammation, allergies, infection, or abnormal stool, your groomer may be able to handle as well. If it’s a larger problem that requires internal expression, you should be referred over to your vet.

Matting
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Some breeds with longer hair are prone to matting (also known as knotted balls of hair), especially in hard to detangle areas like the face, neck and ears. Besides looking a bit rough around the edges, mats can be painful because they pull the skin tight and can lead to skin ulcers, abrasions and other problems. Sometimes a mat can be cut out with scissors, but other times they require a complete shave down. The good news is that with a regular grooming schedule, mats can easily be prevented.

First Vet Check: Top Questions to Ask


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Now that you’re a new parent of a bundle of furry joy, it’s your responsibility to take care of your pup’s health needs. It’s crucial to do your research when choosing your veterinarian. Visit a few in your area, get recommendations from friends or neighbors, and make sure you’re comfortable with the physician’s medical philosophy (for example, some vets may be more aggressive in prescribing medications whereas others may prefer a holistic, natural treatment method).

thumbnail-first-vet-visitThe best vets have busy schedules, so make sure to schedule your new puppy’s health exam as soon as you know his/her arrival date. Plus, PuppySpot requires all new pups complete a new puppy exam within 48 hours of arrival in order to lock in our 10-year health guarantee.

Once you’ve scheduled your first visit with the vet of your choice, you’ll want to come prepared with questions to get the most out of your checkup. Print this list to use as a guide. You’ll thank us later!

  • What types of parasites are common in our area, and what can I do to prevent them?
    Your veterinarian will likely administer deworming medication to
    ensure your pup stays healthy and parasite-free. It’s important to understand the types of parasites are common in your area and what symptoms to look for should your pup contract any of them.
  • Where can I find emergency care for my pet during evenings, weekends or holidays?
    Most vets are not open late during the week or at all on weekends and holidays. Your vet will have a preferred emergency care facility and/or hotline to refer you to.
  •  What are the office’s medical capabilities/offerings?
    Some vets have a clinical surgery center on site, but most do not. Ask what type of procedures, testing or exams they’re able to perform at this location and for which procedures they will refer you to another provider.
  •  Which vaccines are necessary and which are optional based on my puppy’s lifestyle?

    There are standard vaccinations all puppies should receive: distemper, adenovirus-2, canine parvovirus-2, and rabies. However, based on your geographic location, your pup may require additional vaccinations such as leptospirosis, Lyme disease and Bordetella. 
  • What flea/tick medication do you recommend?
    Even if you live in an urban city, there is still a risk for fleas and ticks. Fleas and ticks can live in most environments and can frequently travel with other pets or wildlife to new regions in the country.
  • What is considered a healthy weight for my dog’s breed?
    This goes along with how often you should be feeding your pup. You’ll want to work with your vet to ensure your new pup maintains a healthy weight to avoid other associated health issues in the future.
  • Is pet insurance right for my pet, and what should I look for when choosing an insurance plan?
    Pet insurance can be vital in helping keeping care costs low, especially if your pet requires an expensive procedure or surgery down the line. Ask if your vet accepts health insurance and what their policy is. For example, PuppySpot offers comprehensive insurance plans through Trupanion which provides 90% coverage of new injuries and illnesses, including hereditary and congenital conditions.
  • How often should my puppy be examined?
    Work out a convenient schedule with your vet to make sure your pup is being seen on a regular or as-needed basis.
  • When should my puppy be spayed or neutered?
    Spaying or neutering your puppy provides numerous health benefits and should be considered if you are not planning on breeding your dog.
  • What is typical wait time and do you take walk-ins?Unfortunately, unless it’s a routine checkup, there will be times when you urgently need to see your vet. Ask these questions to have realistic expectations on how quickly you’ll be able to see the doctor in an emergency.