Tag Archives: Pomeranian

Tips for Dealing with Dog Fur

It’s a known fact that most dogs shed, but this doesn’t keep us from loving them. At the same, it can be a pain to find fur all over your clothes and furniture. Some breeds, such as Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds and Siberian Huskies, shed more than others. Whatever the breed, we’ve got the tips you need to keep your dog’s shedding under control.

Brush, brush, brush!

Brushing your dog’s fur regularly (for some dogs, this means daily) pulls out the loose hair that will otherwise end up on your carpet. It will also leave Fido’s coat cleaner and softer and will prevent his fur from matting.

Invest in a good vacuum.

Especially if your dog sheds seasonally, you’ll need a good vacuum to pick up after his fur. Spare yourself the headaches that come with a weak-suction vacuum and get yourself a machine that will get the job done the first time.

Use a lint roller.

Don’t underestimate the power of a good lint roller. The simple, inexpensive product can be a lifesaver in a home with a super-shedding dog. Use an extra sticky lint roller such as this one to easily pick up stray fur from yourself and from around the house.

Feed your dog a high-quality diet.
Dog food made from mostly corn or grains can be difficult for your pup to digest, causing dry skin and excess shedding. Food allergies can also contribute to hair loss and skin issues, in which case a veterinarian should be consulted. A diet high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids can improve overall coat texture.

Choose the right brush for your pup.

The type of brush you use for your pup can make a big difference in controlling his shedding. Your veterinarian can advise on what kind of brush to use, but there are generally brushes for two fur types: short and long. For dogs like Beagles and Bulldogs with shorter coats, a natural-bristle brush or hound mitt can be used. For dogs with longer, thicker coats, especially double-coated breeds like Pomeranians and Collies, a slicker brush or rake makes a better tool for getting rid of all that fur. Start by brushing in the opposite direction of your pup’s hair growth, then brush again in the direction of hair growth to fully remove all the loose, dead fur.

Give your dog a bath.

Regularly bathing your pup is not only a staple of good doggy hygiene, but it is also key to a healthy coat. Products like NuVet Conditioning Oatmeal Shampoo help sooth itchy skin and prevent dryness that can ultimately lead to hair loss.

While shedding might be one of the few things we don’t quite love about our dogs, it doesn’t have to be a burden. Instead, grooming your pup can become a daily bonding activity for the two of you. Less fur, more fun!

All About Designer Dog Breeds

Hear a kind of dog with a funny or unique name lately? It’s probably a “designer breed,” also known as a hybrid of two different dog breeds. The first generation of designer dogs are developed by crossing two purebreds, and the offspring of these crosses go by the same name. For example, the parents of a Goldendoodle can either be a Golden Retriever and a Poodle, or two Goldendoodles. Most designer breeds were developed in the early 2000’s and have become increasingly popular since then by serving different purposes. Learn more about 10 of our favorite designer dogs, below!

1. Goldendoodle


The Goldendoodle is a cross between a Golden Retriever and Poodle. The breed hybrid was developed in the 1990’s to have the friendly, energetic nature of a Golden Retriever and the allergy-friendly coat of a Poodle and has since become one of America’s most popular dogs.

2. Labradoodle


Labradoodles are a cross between a Labrador Retriever and Poodle. Developed in Australia in the late 1980’s, this breed hybrid continues to gain popularity for its easy trainability and outgoing personality. They were originally bred as allergy-friendly aids to the blind, and they are now a favorite companion dog among many North American homes.

3. Maltipoo


This popular mix known as the Maltipoo is a combination of a Maltese and a Poodle. The breed was specially created to be a small-sized companion dog with an allergy-friendly coat. They are clever and quick to learn, and make great watch dogs, often barking at anything suspicious in sight! The Maltipoo will charm your socks off, and then curl up on your feet to keep your toes warm.

4. Cockapoo


The Cockapoo is made by breeding a Cocker Spaniel with a Poodle. This breed is one of the older “designer” breeds, likely resulting from an accidental breeding in the 1960’s. Cockapoos are people-oriented, compassionate, intelligent and make excellent pets for families with children. They are prized for their intelligence, low-shedding coat and easygoing nature.

5. Frenchton


The Frenchton is a mix between a French Bulldog and a Boston Terrier, but unlike other designer dog breeds which are half one breed and half another, Frenchtons are 75 percent French bulldog and 25 percent Boston Terrier. This dog was developed in the 1990’s to create a healthier, more energetic breed than its parent breeds. These dogs are friendly, loving and intelligent, and are well suited for apartment living.

6. Morkie


The Morkie is a cross between a Maltese and a Yorkshire Terrier. Both parent breeds are known for having a lot of personality, so it doesn’t come as a surprise that the Morkie does as well! They love to play and exercise, and are eager to please their owners. As long as they have a lap to sit on, they do equally well in apartments or larger living spaces.

7. Pomsky


A cross between a Pomeranian and a Siberian Husky, the Pomsky has achieved rapid popularity in recent years. Usually active and energetic, this rarer designer breed tends to be highly intelligent, loving, playful and self-assured. Pomskies can also make great guard dogs, like both of their parent breeds. The appearance and size of a Pomsky can vary greatly, but very often they look like miniature Huskies.

8. Puggle


The Puggle is a cross between a Beagle and a Pug. Originating in the 1980s, Puggles combine the Beagle’s boundless energy and the Pug’s warm, loving personality. These dogs also have the Beagle’s incredible sense of smell and desire to track, and the Pug’s slightly pushed-in face. They vary in color and size, but are consistently popular family dogs and easy to take care of and train.

9. Shihpoo


This crossbreed is a mix between a Shih-Tzu and a Poodle. Shihpoos are very loving and playful, and get along very well with other pets and children. Also known as “Shoodles,” these are easy to train, intelligent dogs that do well in any size home. The appearance of a Shihpoo may vary, but this dog consistently has a cute, alert expression and a devoted, people-oriented personality.

10. Aussiedoodle


The Aussiedoodle is a cross between an Australian Shepherd and a Poodle. Each of those parent breeds is considered one of the more intelligent breeds, so crossing the two makes for a super-smart pup! Aussiedoodles are wonderful for families with small children, but watch out: they sometimes bump into children with the intent to “herd” them! While Aussiedoodles love to be active, they are just as happy curling up at your feet as they are happy playing outside.

These are just 10 of the many adorable designer breeds out there. Do you have a favorite designer dog that didn’t make the list?

Check Out These 7 St. Patrick’s Day Puppies!

On St. Patrick’s Day, we wear green, talk like leprechauns and bet on our luck. These 7 cute PuppySpot pups are in the St. Patty’s sprit!

Churchill the Bulldog dons a leprechaun hat today.

Dylam the Havanese is looking for a four-leaf clover.

This Pomeranian named Coco Bear wonders if she’ll find the pot of gold under a rainbow today.

Patty the Rottweiler celebrates St. Patty’s in style.

This Maltese named Giovani is waist-deep in Irish ale.

Molly the Lab won’t get caught getting pinched this year!

Lucky #7 is Ruthy the German Shepherd!

 

A Step by Step Tutorial to Leash Training

We’ve all seen those dogs. The ones who zigzag every which way on their walks. The ones who mark on every tree. The ones who drag their owners down the street. It begs the question: Who is walking who anyway?

Prevent these unfortunately common situations from becoming your situation by leash training as soon as you’re able to take your puppy for walks. While it may seem simple (hook leash to collar and walk, right?), you’ll soon find that walking in a straight line at a normal pace is not a natural habit for your active puppy.

By following these steps, you’ll be on your way to walking your pawfect pooch down the street with ease and confidence.

1. Choose the Right Leash and Collar
Make sure the collar is the perfect fit by asking for professional help with sizing. It’s important that it’s not too tight nor too loose. A good guideline is to be able to fit two fingers between the collar and your pup’s skin. You may want to consider a harness instead of a collar to avoid neck strain from leash pulling. A harness is a good option for dogs with short snouts like Pugs or breeds with elongated, slender necks like Greyhounds.

As far as leashes go, there are a variety of materials and lengths available, so to make the right decision, you’ll want to test them out at the pet store with your dog present. A few things to consider – nylon leashes (which are the most common) may cause “leash burn” if you have a strong dog that pulls suddenly. Leather leashes are stronger, provide a natural give, and will soften with time. Chain leashes, which are an inexpensive choice, can be dangerous if a strong dog pulls and the leash is wrapped around your finger. Retractable or “flexi” leashes are designed to give dogs more freedom, but can be dangerous for a puppy as they provide the owner with much less control. “Reeling in” your pooch fast enough in an emergency is a challenge. Plus, the instinct of pulling the leash when your dog does something wrong could give you a severe rope burn if you were to grab that thin cord. We strongly advise against a retractable leash for a puppy in leash training.

The length of the lead is also a factor to consider when choosing the right leash for you. If you live in the city, a 4-foot might be long enough to allow your dog to do his business while keeping him close to your side. If you live in a suburban setting and have a bit more space to walk, you may want to choose a 6-foot lead.

2. Introduce The Collar and Leash
Slip the collar and leash on your pup while he’s doing something positive such as feeding, playing or getting pet. This way, the puppy associates the collar and leash with positive activity. If the dog resists, use treats or toys as incentive to getting him to feel more comfortable.

3. Take Your First Walk…Inside
Guide your puppy around your home so he gets used to you leading him around without all of the new smells and distractions of the outdoors. If you have a backyard, use that space as an opportunity to walk your pup outside to the spot where you want him to do, as opposed to letting him have run of the yard.

4. Teach to Follow
Getting your dog to heel is a gradual process so don’t expect it to happen quickly. Technically, the “heel” position is for your pup to walk along your left side at knee level. This is a bit ambitious and unnecessary for rudimentary leash training, so don’t worry so much about positioning as keeping your pup at a safe, comfortable distance. Hold the leash with a firm grip and double up any extra slack so it doesn’t drag on the ground. Make sure you have treats at the ready in your pocket to reward whenever your pup listens to you.

Once puppy is focused on the reward, say a simple command like “Let’s go!” – make sure it’s something you’ll remember to use consistently. Once he follows, give him a treat. You could bring it as close to right under his nose to get his attention. Continue to repeat this process in order to lure him into the pace and direction you want to him to go in.Once he’s performed this exercise several times well, offer the treats less and more intermittently.

If your dog pulls, quickly turn and walk in the opposite direction. You’ll do some stop-and-start at first, but eventually he’ll become accustomed to the rules. Reinforce the distance and pace you want him to keep by continuing to reward with praise and treats when he does follow. Some dogs may decide to sit or lay down rather than move. If this happens, call your pup and offer him a reward once he comes over. Never yank the leash toward you. Once he decides to walk next to you, offer him a treat.

5. Slowly Add More Depth to Your Training
Once your dog is walking well on a leash alongside you, you can work on other techniques such as “sit” whenever you stop, introducing the “heel” command, and increasing the number of distractions in the surrounding area. If you’ve been practicing on a quiet cul-de-sac, try taking him to a park or busy street.

9 Pups Who Prove Smiling is Contagious

It’s been proven that smiling is contagious and that your pooch can recognize human emotion on faces. We dare you to look at these pleased pups and not reciprocate their cheerful dispositions.

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This Shipoo is delighted to see you.

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This Bulldog wants a high-five.

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This Springer Spaniel is pleased as punch.

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This Husky is drunk with laughter.

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This German Shepherd wants you to THROW THE BALL ALREADY.

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This Pomeranian has never been happier to go for a ride in the car.

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This Shar-Pei is relieved to take a nap.

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This Shichon is takes “Tongue Out Tuesday” very seriously.

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This Corgi is ready for his close-up.

Big or Small? Choosing a Dog Breed Based on Size

When it comes to deciding what kind of puppy to add to the family, size is a factor that should be considered. The difference between big and small dog breeds is for some, the difference between two completely different dogs. They’re not only different physically, but many argue that big dogs and small dogs have different personalities, too. Below are some things to keep in mind in order to make an informed decision about which size dog is right for you.

Space
The size of your home should be a deciding factor in what size dog you should choose to live in it. While small dogs can do well in both apartments and houses, a large dog may not thrive as well in small living spaces due to its energy level and exercise needs. Some big dogs, like Great Danes and Greyhounds, can manage in an apartment because of their lower energy levels, but as you are probably already aware, some buildings do not allow tenants to have larger dogs, no matter the personality. And even if you have a house with a large yard, a big dog will still have to be taken out to get plenty of exercise to fulfill its physical needs. If you’re someone who loves the outdoors and lives an active lifestyle, then a big dog could be the right fit for you.

Training and Behavioral Issues
When it comes to training, bigger dog breeds are generally more open to taking to direction, while things like house-training tend to be harder to teach smaller dogs. Smaller dogs are also known to have more behavioral issues and excitable demeanors. There’s a name for it—small dog syndrome—which is characterized by a small dog that acts much bigger than its size, including yapping, barking, and intimidating dogs much larger than itself. According to Psychology Today, this might be due in part to the way owners treat their small dogs as compared to big dogs. However, while big dogs may be more obedient, the physical aspects of training a big dog, such as retraining the dog from getting into something he shouldn’t or catching him when he runs away, can be more difficult.

Cost
It takes more to maintain a big dog than it does a small one. While some fashionable small dogs such as Pomeranians carry a large price tag, big dogs can be more expensive in the long run because of their additional needs. Because they eat considerably more than small dogs with lower exercise needs, big dogs necessitate greater spending on food, which is one of the biggest dog-related expenses. In addition, groomers typically charge more to take bigger dogs, but the frequency of needed visits of course depends on your dog’s coat type.

Lifespan
Small dogs have a longer lifespan than big dogs. Since large dogs age faster though, they will also be more mature for the duration of time you have them. With a small dog, you might have a puppy-acting adult on your hands for quite a few years.

There are some exceptions to these generalizations. For example, toy and miniature Poodles are small dogs with calm, even temperaments and are highly trainable, while Siberian Huskies are often difficult for a pup-parent beginner to control. Despite these characterizations, personalities differ from one dog to another, so training is key to ensure you make the best out of whichever size dog you choose.

6 DIY Costume Ideas for Your Dog This Halloween

Halloween is coming up, and if you like to go trick-or-treating with your favorite furry friend by your side, you’ll have to make sure he looks the part. Below are six costume ideas to make this Halloween with your pup spooktacular!

1. Haunting Ghost

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Source: toptenscentral.com

Go with this classic and super-simple Halloween look that will be sure to spook both your human and dog neighbors! All you need is an old white sheet and a pair of scissors. Put the sheet over your dog’s body and carefully cut out holes for his eyes and muzzle. Cut the extra fabric off, making the bottom of the sheet look torn and frayed. Make sure the sheet is not so long to prevent your dog from tripping over it. For extra points, teach him to say “Oooh!”

 

2. Pokémon GO! Player and Pikachu

pokemon
Source: PinkNews

Here’s a costume you can coordinate with your pup! With the recent Pokémon GO! craze taking over, a fun idea is to dress up as a player and dress your dog as a Pikachu. This look will work best with a white, fluffy, pointy-eared dog such as a Pomeranian or Siberian Husky. To transform into a game player, you will need a tracksuit with your team color of choice (yellow for Instinct, blue for Mystic and red for Valor). Pair the outfit with matching sneakers, hat and a backpack. Finally, make your own Pokéball by pasting white and black construction paper around a tennis ball in the appropriate pattern.

To turn Fido into Pikachu, you will either need a dye that is safe for pets, or natural food coloring. Absolutely DO NOT use hair dye or any dye with synthetic chemicals on your dog. His skin has a pH level that is more reactive than yours to the harmful chemicals in human dyes. Do not use dye on him if he has any persisting health issues. Food coloring is the safest option, whether it is store bought, or one you make at home. You can make your own “dye” using pigmented foods that are safe for your dog to eat, such as beets, blackberries, carrots, spinach, and turmeric powder. Squeeze or mash the ingredients to get the color out, and feel free to mix-and-match ingredients to get the color you desire. Once you’ve determined a dye is safe, apply yellow dye to your dog’s fur using a large brush. Then, clean the brush and use it to paint black stripes on his back and the tips of his ears. Finish by giving him Pikachu’s signature red-circle cheeks. Since it usually takes about four-six weeks for the dye to fade, you’ll be set to catch ‘em all long after Halloween night!


3. Harley Quinn from Suicide Squad

Photo from Wikipedia.org
Source: Wikipedia.org

This devilish character has been a copycat favorite of fans since the movie came out this year, and the doggie version will be sure to scare the socks off your friends (or kill them with cuteness)! The look works best on light-colored, long-eared and furry dogs like Cocker Spaniels or Afghan Hounds. Depending on your dog’s breed, you will apply a natural dye (see instructions for dye use above) to both sides of his head which will make him appear as though he has two long pigtails. Dye the right side pink and the left side blue to match Harley Quinn’s hairstyle, then paint a small black heart on his upper left cheek. Secure the ponytails with matching-colored ribbons, but make sure they are not too tight on your dog’s ears. For the outfit, take an old, white T-shirt and paint the sleeves red. Then, make him boots using white fabric or felt. Finish off the look by making a baton out of construction paper or cardboard and securing it to his outfit, making sure it’s safe and comfortable for him. With this look, no one will want to get on your puppy’s bad side.


4. Beanie Baby

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Source: purewow.com

This costume is one that requires very minimal effort. Your pooch is already cute and cuddly as is, so it won’t take much time to make him look like our favorite childhood toy. All you need to do is recreate the Beanie Baby tag using construction paper and markers, punch a hole through, and tie the tag to your dog’s collar. With this costume, he’ll look cute enough to squish!


5. Fearsome Lion

Photo from odditymail.com
Source: odditymail.com

Want your dog to be the King of the Jungle? All you’ll need is some reddish-brown faux fur, scissors, a needle and thread. This costume looks especially ferocious on Golden Retrievers and other big, light brown-colored dogs. Make a mane by fashioning the faux fur into a wreath around your pooch’s neck and sewing the ends together. For an even more authentic look, trim your dog’s coat so there is only long fur on the bottom of his legs and end of his tail (or if he’s a short-coated breed, attach pieces of faux fur to these areas). If you put effort into the details, you can end up with one scary-looking beast!


6. Superhero

Photo from costumecraze.com
Source: costumecraze.com

Your dog’s already a superhero in your eyes, so why not let the rest of the world see him that way, too? Take a piece of red fabric and tie it around her collar for a flowing cape. For the chest, take a blue square of fabric, fold it in half, and cut out a circle for your dog’s head. Then sew the sides together, leaving holes for your dog’s front legs to go through. Finally, print out the Superwoman or Superman logo, cut it out, and stick it to the chest. Fido’s ready to save the day!

 

 

 

 

Dog Breeds by Fur: Low to High Maintenance Pooches

When deciding on the best dog for your family, grooming responsibilities probably don’t top of the list of criteria during breed selection. However, depending on your financial situation and time constraints, hair may be a factor worth considering. Depending on the type of dog and their grooming needs, you could be visiting a professional groomer as much as every two-four weeks, or at a minimum, intensively brushing at home on a daily basis. Here’s a rundown of the lowest to highest maintenance pups when it comes to hair, which should help with setting expectations, planning and budgeting.

Short-haired, smaller dogs are going to require the least amount of grooming. An important caveat however is that even though these breeds are short-haired, they will still shed somewhat as all dogs shed some fur. Check out these breeds with low grooming needs if you’d rather not trade in your day job for a styling gig.

Italian Greyhound
Boston Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
• Harrier
Dalmation
• Whippet
• German Pinscher
• Basenji
• Australian Kelpie
Weimaraner
Vizsla
• English Foxhound
Boxer
Rottweiler
• Black & Tan Coonhound
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Mastiff
Great Dane
Bloodhound
• Neapolitan Mastiff

talk-ab-fur-thumbnailConversely, if you can’t resist a fluffy, long-haired pup, target this list of styling breeds, who require more hands-on attention to their coats to avoid matting, shedding and hygiene issues.

Akita
Alaskan Malamute
• Bearded Collie
Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise
• Border Terrier (or most terriers, for that matter)
Bulldog
Chow Chow
Cockapoo
Cocker Spaniel (and most other Spaniels)
Collie
• English or Irish Setter
• Giant, Standard and Miniature Schnauzers
Havanese
Lhasa Apso
Maltipoo
Old English Sheepdog (and other sheep dogs)
• Pekingese
Pomeranian
Poodle
Portuguese Water Dog
Shih Tzu
Siberian Husky

Hold The Elevator: Best Dogs For Apartment Living

While any dog can thrive in an apartment setting if given the right amount of exercise, there are certain breeds considered ideal housemates in smaller living spaces. As a general rule of thumb, if a dog can fit in your purse, it can fit in your apartment – but there are exceptions! Some small breeds have high energy levels, and would do best with more room to run and play. On the other hand, some larger breeds are low energy and wouldn’t mind living in an apartment with less space. So, with a grain of salt, take a look at these perfect apartment-dwelling breeds based on size, energy level and personality.

Yorkie – The ever-popular Yorkie is cute, cuddly and compact – what more could you ask for? These small, affectionate dogs are keen to be near their owners, typically only weigh between 5-7 pounds, and are easily exercised indoors.

MalteseMaltese are adorable, gentle companions. They are the quintessential lap dog and love to be pampered, cuddled and held. These 4-7 pound dogs are also easy to train, and don’t have high exercise requirements, making them excellent apartment residents.

Havanese – These small dogs have big personalities! Eager to learn and easily trained, Havanese are between 10-15 pounds when fully grown, and make excellent companion pets. They are playful and somewhat active, but are easily manageable in an apartment.

PugPugs have an amusing, distinctive appearance and are generally considered to be a very adaptable breed. They are loyal, quiet dogs that love to be with their owners and have low exercise requirements, making them a good pet for living spaces of any size.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – These dogs want nothing more than to be by your side! Fairly small at 13-18 pounds, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is friendly and easy going, and will get along with anyone. They excel in smaller living spaces because of their calm and adaptable nature.

Bichon Frise – This fancy, fluffy pup is energetic, but can be exercised easily indoors as well as out. At only 7-12 pounds., the Bichon makes a quiet, loving apartment dog – and bonus, they shed much less than other breeds, ideal for living in close quarters!

Bulldog (French and English) – Both French and English Bulldogs tend to be low energy, content to laze around and be by your side, which make them great apartment pets. These dogs thrive on human contact and make great watchdogs. Plus, have you seen those adorable wrinkly faces…?

Shih Tzu – Bred to be a friendly lap dog, the Shih Tzu is certainly good at its job! They are affectionate, mellow and adaptable to any living environment.

hold-elevator-thumbnailBoston Terrier – Ideal because of their size, this breed is fairly energetic and will need to be walked daily. But, if you can keep a Boston Terrier well-exercised, these little gentlemen and ladies make devoted, gentle apartment pets.

Dachshund – These distinctive dogs have short legs, long bodies, and big hearts. They are lively dogs that love to exercise indoors and out. Dachshunds tend to attach strongly to their owners and are extremely affectionate, making them great roommates.

ChihuahuaChihuahuas are tiny and love to cuddle – especially in the cold winter months, as they can be sensitive to low temperatures. They require minimal exercise, but are fun and playful when you want to be active. These little guys and girls make excellent apartment dogs!

Pomeranian – This little fluff ball is feisty and full of energy, but at only 3-7 pounds, they don’t need much room to get their exercise! The Pomeranian is affectionate and outgoing and will take comfort in curling up next to you, no matter how small your apartment.

Great Dane – So, a Great Dane might not seem like the best option for an apartment based on his size – anywhere from 100-200 pounds as adults – but these big guys are actually very low energy and are content to lay on the couch right next to you. As quiet and friendly as they are, this breed would make an excellent apartment roommate!