Tag Archives: Poodle

5 Things You Didn’t Know About the Maltipoo


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The Maltipoo is a popular “designer dog” created from crossing a Maltese with a Poodle. These adorable little pups are #18 on our list of most popular dog breeds, beloved for their playful and clever nature. Maltipoos make the perfect companion dog, but there’s more to them than that. Read on for 5 facts you need to know about Maltipoos!

1. They’re allergy-friendly.
While they differ from one dog to another, Maltipoos are known for their allergy-friendly, low-shedding coats. Their Poodle genes give them this hypoallergenic quality, making them a great choice for people with allergies.

2. They come in a variety of colors.
While Maltese dogs are typically only white, Poodles can come in many colors, such as black, white, brown and gray. Likewise, putting these two breeds together can result in a combination of different colored Maltipoos. These include apricot, black and silver, red, café au lait and many more.

3. They’re not all the same size.
A Maltipoo’s size varies based on its parent breeds. Typically, a toy Poodle is bred with a Maltese to create a Maltipoo, but sometimes miniature Poodles are used, resulting in larger Maltipoos. Adult Maltipoos range from anywhere between 5 and 12 pounds.

4. They’re forever young.

A big part of the appeal of Maltipoos is their tendency to stay “puppy-like” even as adults. While they’ll grow physically and mentally, Maltipoos tend to maintain the same cute playfulness they had when they were puppies. You’ll never grow tired of them!

5. They’re a celebrity favorite.
Maltipoos are up in the ranks of celebrity fame. Their owners include big names such as Rihanna, Miley Cyrus, Blake Lively and Ellen DeGeneres.

What do you love about Maltipoos? Share your thoughts, below!

All About Designer Dog Breeds


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Hear a kind of dog with a funny or unique name lately? It’s probably a “designer breed,” also known as a hybrid of two different dog breeds. The first generation of designer dogs are developed by crossing two purebreds, and the offspring of these crosses go by the same name. For example, the parents of a Goldendoodle can either be a Golden Retriever and a Poodle, or two Goldendoodles. Most designer breeds were developed in the early 2000’s and have become increasingly popular since then by serving different purposes. Learn more about 10 of our favorite designer dogs, below!

1. Goldendoodle


The Goldendoodle is a cross between a Golden Retriever and Poodle. The breed hybrid was developed in the 1990’s to have the friendly, energetic nature of a Golden Retriever and the allergy-friendly coat of a Poodle and has since become one of America’s most popular dogs.

2. Labradoodle


Labradoodles are a cross between a Labrador Retriever and Poodle. Developed in Australia in the late 1980’s, this breed hybrid continues to gain popularity for its easy trainability and outgoing personality. They were originally bred as allergy-friendly aids to the blind, and they are now a favorite companion dog among many North American homes.

3. Maltipoo


This popular mix known as the Maltipoo is a combination of a Maltese and a Poodle. The breed was specially created to be a small-sized companion dog with an allergy-friendly coat. They are clever and quick to learn, and make great watch dogs, often barking at anything suspicious in sight! The Maltipoo will charm your socks off, and then curl up on your feet to keep your toes warm.

4. Cockapoo


The Cockapoo is made by breeding a Cocker Spaniel with a Poodle. This breed is one of the older “designer” breeds, likely resulting from an accidental breeding in the 1960’s. Cockapoos are people-oriented, compassionate, intelligent and make excellent pets for families with children. They are prized for their intelligence, low-shedding coat and easygoing nature.

5. Frenchton


The Frenchton is a mix between a French Bulldog and a Boston Terrier, but unlike other designer dog breeds which are half one breed and half another, Frenchtons are 75 percent French bulldog and 25 percent Boston Terrier. This dog was developed in the 1990’s to create a healthier, more energetic breed than its parent breeds. These dogs are friendly, loving and intelligent, and are well suited for apartment living.

6. Morkie


The Morkie is a cross between a Maltese and a Yorkshire Terrier. Both parent breeds are known for having a lot of personality, so it doesn’t come as a surprise that the Morkie does as well! They love to play and exercise, and are eager to please their owners. As long as they have a lap to sit on, they do equally well in apartments or larger living spaces.

7. Pomsky


A cross between a Pomeranian and a Siberian Husky, the Pomsky has achieved rapid popularity in recent years. Usually active and energetic, this rarer designer breed tends to be highly intelligent, loving, playful and self-assured. Pomskies can also make great guard dogs, like both of their parent breeds. The appearance and size of a Pomsky can vary greatly, but very often they look like miniature Huskies.

8. Puggle


The Puggle is a cross between a Beagle and a Pug. Originating in the 1980s, Puggles combine the Beagle’s boundless energy and the Pug’s warm, loving personality. These dogs also have the Beagle’s incredible sense of smell and desire to track, and the Pug’s slightly pushed-in face. They vary in color and size, but are consistently popular family dogs and easy to take care of and train.

9. Shihpoo


This crossbreed is a mix between a Shih-Tzu and a Poodle. Shihpoos are very loving and playful, and get along very well with other pets and children. Also known as “Shoodles,” these are easy to train, intelligent dogs that do well in any size home. The appearance of a Shihpoo may vary, but this dog consistently has a cute, alert expression and a devoted, people-oriented personality.

10. Aussiedoodle


The Aussiedoodle is a cross between an Australian Shepherd and a Poodle. Each of those parent breeds is considered one of the more intelligent breeds, so crossing the two makes for a super-smart pup! Aussiedoodles are wonderful for families with small children, but watch out: they sometimes bump into children with the intent to “herd” them! While Aussiedoodles love to be active, they are just as happy curling up at your feet as they are happy playing outside.

These are just 10 of the many adorable designer breeds out there. Do you have a favorite designer dog that didn’t make the list?

5 Things You Didn’t Know About the Labradoodle


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They’re furry with a funny name, and they’re #13 on PuppySpot’s list of most popular dog breeds! We’re talking about Labradoodles, the “designer dog” cross between a Labrador Retriever and Poodle. Developed in Australia in the late 1980’s, this breed hybrid continues to gain popularity for its easy trainability and outgoing personality. Below are 5 facts you need to know about Labradoodles!

1. They’re a good choice for people with allergies.

While Labradoodle fur varies from dog to dog, the hybrid tends to be a good choice for those with allergies to shedding dogs. Because of its Poodle-like fur, Labradoodles hardly shed and are virtually hypoallergenic.

2. They serve a special purpose.
The Australian Guide Dog Association first bred Labradoodles in 1989 as an allergy-friendly seeing eye dog. Their smart, social nature and low-shedding coats make them perfect for visually-impaired people who suffer from pet allergies.

3. They have good genes.
As a cross between two different breeds, Labradoodles have a healthy genetic pool of variation. According to Goldendoodles.com, first generation (F1) crosses (the product of a Labrador Retriever and Poodle) have the highest “hybrid vigour,” which is the idea that the first generation offspring are healthier than each of their individual parent lines.

4. No two Labradoodles are alike.
Since Labradoodles are not purebreds, the characteristics of any one Labradoodle cannot be predicted. A first generation Labradoodle may look more like its Poodle parent or its Labrador Retriever parent, and may possess any variation of personality or genetic qualities from either of its parents. These qualities become more consistent as Labradoodles are bred between each other.

5. They love the water.

Labradoodles don’t mind getting their paws wet. In fact, they love to play around in the rain, jump in puddles and go swimming, too.

Learned something new about the doodle? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Why the World Needs Purebred Dogs


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May 1 is National Purebred Dog Day, a day to appreciate the centuries-old tradition of breeding dogs for specifically valued traits. The day’s founder, Susi Szeremy, writes that each dog breed is “a living legacy of the culture that created it,” and the continuation of purebreds keeps their respective culture’s history alive. While mixed breeds are cool, too, there are good reasons to support purebreds. Read on for the top three reasons why we think the world still needs purebred dogs.

1. They’re predictable.

One big reason why purebreds are valued dogs is their predictability. Because each breed is bred for specific traits, one can expect to find particular physical and behavioral qualities in any one member of the breed. While these traits can vary within individual dogs, you know that if you breed a Chihuahua you’ll be getting a pint-sized pup that fits in your purse, while if you breed a Great Dane, she’ll be even bigger than the Chihuahua the moment she’s born! Moreover, the predictability of purebreds makes them indispensable in the many pup-powered jobs which our communities depend on. In the US alone, ten million people suffer from allergies, many of whom rely on specific allergy-friendly dog breeds to accommodate their health needs. For example, the intelligent and low-shedding Poodle makes a qualified assistant to disabled people with dog allergies. Purebred dogs are our service dogs, police dogs, military dogs and of course, the loving companions that brighten up our homes. They can be specially trained to serve purposes that go above and beyond fetching a bone. Purebred dogs are society’s four-legged superheroes, often trained as early on as birth to fulfill roles such as guiding the blind, sniffing out drugs or explosives in the airport, detecting blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, and the list goes on. Purebred dogs are crucial, irreplaceable members of society who improve the lives of people you know every single day.

2. They help us make scientific advancements.

Purebred dogs help us make advancements in science that enhance our understanding of both humans and other dogs. For example, a recent study discovered a gene found in Dalmatians associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in dogs. This research not only reveals an important factor of this canine disease, but it may also lead to a breakthrough in research for respiratory disease in humans. This research and others like it would not be possible if not for the uniform traits in purebreds which lend themselves to objective scientific testing.

3. They tell a story of the past.
Each breed tells a unique story form the time and place in history it came from. Perhaps it was the German Shepherd, herding the fields of Germany during the turn of the 20th Century. Or maybe the Yorkshire Terrier, working alongside factory workers during the Industrial Revolution. Each breed has its very own story tell, and believe it or not, these stories are in danger of fading away. There is such a thing as an endangered dog breed, and if it were not for the efforts of responsible breeders, these breeds would not survive.

Breeding purebreds is not just a tradition that provides us with a fun and furry look into the past. Rather, purebred dogs are indispensable to lending a helping hand (or paw) to present day problems such as physical and mental disabilities and health issues. This National Purebred Dog Day, let’s take a moment to look around at the amazing creatures who fill our lives with joy on a daily basis. We hope to have them around for years to come.

7 Poodle Facts You Didn’t Know


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Poodles are poufy and proud, and they’re #6 on our list of most popular dog breeds. The popular show dogs are known for their intelligence, grace and of course, their beautiful curly coats. We bet you don’t know it all when it comes to this breed, though. Here are 7 facts you need to know about the Poodle!

1. They’ve got beauty and brains.

Poodles are not only lovely to look at; they’re also highly intelligent. They’re the second-smartest dogs in the world according to the AKC, just under the Border Collie.

2. They’re a good choice for people with allergies.
Because their curly coats resemble hair more than fur, Poodles are considered virtually hypoallergenic, odorless and tend to be a good choice for those with allergies to shedding dogs. However, like human hair, their fur grows continuously and needs to be managed accordingly.

3. They come in three sizes.

The poodle is the only dog that comes in three sizes: standard, miniature, and toy. However, they are all the same breed. Standard poodles weigh 40-70 pounds, miniature poodles 15-17 pounds, and toy poodles a miniscule 6-9 pounds.

4. There’s a reason for those bulbous hairdos.

Your first image of a Poodle is most likely the meticulously groomed pooch with perfectly shaped spheres of fluff. Turns out there’s a specific use for what’s known as the “Poodle clip.” Relevant to its history as a water retriever, the Poodle’s fancy haircut is meant to strategically protect its joints and vital organs in cold water. Interesting, huh?

5. They’re globally coveted dogs.
While the breed originated in Germany, many think of Poodles as a French breed because of the widespread popularity Toy Poodles have achieved, starting in France under the rule of King Louis XVI. They even hold the title as the official dog of France! Poodles continue to receive worldwide allure; recently, toy brown poodles have become the current pet trend in Asia.

6. They’re athletic.

Despite their reputation as prim and proper dogs, Poodles love to get down and dirty. They’re great swimmers, and were originally bred to hunt water fowl. Along with their strong, springy legs, they also have plenty of energy to do the tricks you’ll see them perform at dog shows.

7. They were the pet of many famous celebrities.
Poodles are a favorite among both past and present celebrities, the list of which includes famous figures like Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Streisand, Jackie Kennedy, Debbie Reynolds, Walt Disney and Rihanna. Perhaps the biggest celebrity Poodle enthusiast in history was King of Rock and Roll Elvis Presley, who gifted the popular pooches to the special ladies in his life.

Westminster Insight

At the 2017 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, a Minature Poodle named “Danfour Avalon As If” took the winning spot in the Non-Sporting Group.

Do you have a Poodle? Comment below and share what you love about Poodles!

5 Goldendoodle Facts That You Should Know


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The Goldendoodle is a hybrid breed developed in the 1990’s to have the friendly, energetic nature of a Golden Retriever and the allergy-friendly coat of a Poodle. They have since become one of the most popular American dogs and ranked #5 on our list of most popular dog breeds.

Here are 5 Goldendoodle Facts That You Should Know:

1. They’re a good choice for people with allergies.

While Goldendoodle fur varies from dog to dog, the hybrid tends to be a good choice for those with allergies to shedding dogs. Because of its Poodle-like fur, Goldendoodles hardly shed and are virtually hypoallergenic.

2. They’re brainy.

Both parent breeds of the Goldendoodle are in the top 5 of highest ranking in intelligence. The Poodle is #2, while the Golden Retriever is #4. This mix of smarts makes for one brainy pup.

3. They have good genes.

As a cross between two different breeds, Goldendoodles have a healthy genetic pool of variation. According to Goldendoodles.com, first generation (F1) crosses (the product of a Golden Retriever and Poodle) have the highest “hybrid vigour,” which is the idea that the first generation offspring are healthier than each of their individual parent lines.

4. They go by more than one name.

While “Goldendoodle” is the common name for this Golden Retriever-Poodle cross, they can also go by “Golden Poos”, “Goldie Poos”, or “Groodles.”

5. No two Goldendoodles are alike.

Since Goldendoodles are not purebreds, the characteristics of any one Goldendoodle cannot be predicted. A first generation Goldendoodle may look more like its Poodle parent or its Golden Retriever parent, and may possess any variation of personality or genetic qualities from either of its parents. These qualities become more consistent as Goldendoodles are bred between each other.

Ready for your new best friend? Check out our list of adorable Goldendoodle puppies today!

Getting to Know Guide Dogs


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Guide dogs, also known as seeing eye dogs, are special pooches that help the blind navigate their world. Guide Dogs of America provides blind and visually impaired people with guide dogs free of charge in North America. Now that deserves a “round of a-paws.” Let’s get to know more about these paw-some pups and how they perform heroic acts every day.

History
The first school for training service animals, including seeing eye dogs, was established in Germany during World War I to assist veterans blinded in war. Outside of Germany, interest in service dogs did not become widespread until the mid-1900’s. The first guide dogs were German Shepherds, appropriately coming from the service dog school’s country of origin. In 1929, Nashville resident Morris Frank succeeded in convincing Americans to grant people with service animals access to public transportation, hotels and other open public areas. By Federal law, blind people with service dogs are now allowed to go anywhere the general public is allowed, including restaurants, hospitals, stores, airplanes and taxis.

Breeds
The dog breeds used in guide dog service are chosen for their easy trainability and sound temperaments. The most common breeds selected as guide dogs are Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds, but other breeds have also been known to be good choices, such as Labradoodles, Standard Poodles, Collies, Border Collies, Australian Shepherds, Havanese and Vizslas.

Training
Many guide dogs are trained from birth for the special task of aiding the visually impaired. Dogs who start training at birth take about 18 months to complete their program (DGP for Pets). Just like all domesticated dogs, guide dogs must first learn housetraining and basic obedience before receiving additional guide dog training. After about one year, the guide dog meets her partner and they train together for two weeks.

The guide dog recipient is just as responsible in training as the dog. It is the responsibility of the visually impaired person to use his or her senses to judge whether or not it is safe to cross the street, for example, but the guide dog may refute the action if she deems it hazardous. The dog’s intentional refusal of a command is called “intelligent disobedience.”

Meeting a Working Guide Dog Team

If you encounter a visually impaired person with a guide dog, you should treat this person as you would any other stranger on the street and respect boundaries. Do not pet, feed or talk to a guide dog without asking for the owner’s permission first. While they may be irresistibly cute, guide dogs are at work and should not be distracted. After all, the owner depends on his or her guide dog to be vigilant of dangers.

Guide dogs are special service dogs that have helped aid the blind for decades. Their ability to learn techniques above and beyond basic training techniques in order to devotedly assist their partner is truly remarkable. We never cease to be amazed at what dogs can do in our everyday lives.

9 Things You Didn’t Know About the Golden Retriever


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Golden Retrievers always rank high among the most popular breeds in the United States, and they’re #3 on PuppySpot’s list. These loyal, sociable dogs are excellent with children and families, and excel at obedience training and therapy work. They’re eager-to-please companions that can adapt to many environments, from apartments to larger living spaces. Here are 9 facts you need to know about Golden Retrievers!

1. They’re talented.
Not only do they make great family pets, but Goldens are also helpful to greater society. They’re used as hunters, guide dogs, search-and-rescue dogs and more. Their great trainability and keen sense of smell makes them useful for many jobs.

2. They love to swim.
Golden Retrievers give meaning to the term “doggy paddle.” These dogs have a knack for swimming in their blood; they even have water-repellent coats! They’ll joyfully take a dip in the pool or the ocean with you (sometimes without being asked).

3. They’re all over TV and cinema.
The camera loves Goldens, and is it any wonder why? Their friendly smiles and lovable character are irresistible to viewers everywhere. You might recognize the breed from the Disney movie franchise “Air Bud” or from Comet in the TV series “Full House.” This breed is a favorite in television and movies, and we’re not complaining!

4. They’re considered the fourth smartest dog breed.

According to the AKC, Golden Retrievers are the fourth smartest dogs behind the Border Collie, Poodle and German Shepherd. That must be why they’re so good at many different jobs!

5. They belonged to presidents.
US presidents Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan both had Golden Retrievers as pets while serving in the White House. The name of Ford’s Golden was Liberty, and Reagan’s was Victory.

6. They come in three recognized colors.
When it comes to Golden Retrievers, there’s not just one version of “golden.” The three standard colors of this breed are gold, light golden, and dark golden.

7. They’re calm and cool.
Despite their size and strength, Goldens are not particularly loud. They don’t bark much, except for if a stranger comes to the door. Most of the time, this majestic breed is quiet and well-behaved.

8. They get along with others.
Cat, dog, goldfish—doesn’t matter, a Golden can get along with just about anyone. They’re also very gentle around small children, though supervision is still needed because Goldens can get overexcited and accidentally knock over a child.

9. They set the bar for obedience.
Goldens excel in tests of obedience. In fact, they were the first three consecutive winners of AKC’s Obedience trials starting in 1977. These champs are truly outstanding dogs.

Westminster Insight
A Golden Retriver named “Tamarack And Blueprint’s Defying Gravity” placed in third among the Sporting Group at the 2017 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

What do you love about your Golden Retriever? Comment below!

Big or Small? Choosing a Dog Breed Based on Size


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When it comes to deciding what kind of puppy to add to the family, size is a factor that should be considered. The difference between big and small dog breeds is for some, the difference between two completely different dogs. They’re not only different physically, but many argue that big dogs and small dogs have different personalities, too. Below are some things to keep in mind in order to make an informed decision about which size dog is right for you.

Space
The size of your home should be a deciding factor in what size dog you should choose to live in it. While small dogs can do well in both apartments and houses, a large dog may not thrive as well in small living spaces due to its energy level and exercise needs. Some big dogs, like Great Danes and Greyhounds, can manage in an apartment because of their lower energy levels, but as you are probably already aware, some buildings do not allow tenants to have larger dogs, no matter the personality. And even if you have a house with a large yard, a big dog will still have to be taken out to get plenty of exercise to fulfill its physical needs. If you’re someone who loves the outdoors and lives an active lifestyle, then a big dog could be the right fit for you.

Training and Behavioral Issues
When it comes to training, bigger dog breeds are generally more open to taking to direction, while things like house-training tend to be harder to teach smaller dogs. Smaller dogs are also known to have more behavioral issues and excitable demeanors. There’s a name for it—small dog syndrome—which is characterized by a small dog that acts much bigger than its size, including yapping, barking, and intimidating dogs much larger than itself. According to Psychology Today, this might be due in part to the way owners treat their small dogs as compared to big dogs. However, while big dogs may be more obedient, the physical aspects of training a big dog, such as retraining the dog from getting into something he shouldn’t or catching him when he runs away, can be more difficult.

Cost
It takes more to maintain a big dog than it does a small one. While some fashionable small dogs such as Pomeranians carry a large price tag, big dogs can be more expensive in the long run because of their additional needs. Because they eat considerably more than small dogs with lower exercise needs, big dogs necessitate greater spending on food, which is one of the biggest dog-related expenses. In addition, groomers typically charge more to take bigger dogs, but the frequency of needed visits of course depends on your dog’s coat type.

Lifespan
Small dogs have a longer lifespan than big dogs. Since large dogs age faster though, they will also be more mature for the duration of time you have them. With a small dog, you might have a puppy-acting adult on your hands for quite a few years.

There are some exceptions to these generalizations. For example, toy and miniature Poodles are small dogs with calm, even temperaments and are highly trainable, while Siberian Huskies are often difficult for a pup-parent beginner to control. Despite these characterizations, personalities differ from one dog to another, so training is key to ensure you make the best out of whichever size dog you choose.

A Cut Above: The Hottest Pup Hairstyles


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You may think there’s nothing more to dog grooming instruction than the words “just a trim” or “a complete shave.” You’d be wrong however. In fact, there are a variety of simple to complex hairstyles for your pup to sport. If you’re looking to get inspired or educated on the different options, we’ve broken down some of the most common dog hairstyles below. Your pup is sure to be pampered, prepped and photo-ready with any of these choices.

The Puppy Cut
puppy-cutDon’t be fooled, the puppy cut is not just for puppies, but for dogs of any age. This low maintenance do is defined by a uniform, all-over hair length about two inches long and can be achieved on almost any breed. To maintain the short “puppy cut,” depending on how fast your pooch’s hair grows, he may have to get groomed on a weekly basis.

The Teddy Bear Cut
lionThis adorable cut is achieved by trimming the hair around your dog’s head and face evenly, yet keeping the head slightly longer than what’s on the body. The body hair is kept a bit shorter, making this cut ideal for the summer months.

The Lion Trim
Popular among small dogs such as Pomeranians, as well as big, long-haired dogs like Chow Chows, this cut is designed to make your pooch look like a ferocious, yet adorable lion cub. The lion cut is defined by a short cut on the body, with long hair around the head and jaw to create the look of a mane. The tail is kept short until the very end, with a small tuft of hair is left to look like well…a lion.

The Lamb Trim
lambWant your dog to look like a little lamb? Ask for this cut, where both the head and body are trimmed short. This low maintenance look only requires a trip to the groomer every 6-8 weeks, and is great for warm weather, keeping your pup cool.

 

The Poodle or Continental Cut
poodleOne of the most popular cuts for Poodles, there are several different varieties of the “poodle cut,” which is generally is associated with closely trimmed fur around the belly and face and a thick downy fur appearance on the legs, ears and tail. Some variations leave “pom pom” balls on the tail and bottom joints of the legs, which are called bracelets. Not just for poodles, this cut is designed to show off the back legs and is appropriate for any type of dog with thick, curly hair.

The Schnauzer Cut
schnauzerThis adorable cut is a good choice for any breed with similar hair characteristics to the Schnauzer. Longer hair is left on the dog’s legs, while the back and sides are trimmed very short. A light fringe of hair is left on the lower part of the dog’s body, and the signature “mustache” cut sculpts the hair around the face.

 

The Topknot
topknotThis style is typically associated with the Shih Tzu breed, but can be given to any dog with sufficiently long hair, such as the Yorkshire Terrier. Good news for DIY at-home groomers, the style simply requires bunching and tying the hair into a bun at the top of your pooch’s head. It requires no clipping, and follows the current hipster trend adopted by millennials across the country.

Splish Splash: Can Your Pup Do The “Doggie Paddle?”


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Ever imagine your dog running through the ocean waves or swimming alongside you on a hot summer day? You may be in luck. Certain breeds are natural born swimmers. Take a look and see if your pup is ready to get his paws wet.

Golden Retrievers
water-breed-thumbnailThe quintessential water-friendly breed is the Golden Retriever. Early retrievers were crossbred with water spaniels to create the Golden Retriever, which means the breed’s skill for swimming is a biological trait descended down through its ancestry. They’re so suited to water; they even have water-repellent coats!

Irish Water Spaniels
Irish Water Spaniels are one of the most intelligent breeds in the world. The tallest of spaniels, these spunky and lively dogs have curly ringlets, which help form a naturally water-repellent coat. Irish Water Spaniels were trained to hunt for waterfowl, though they enjoy being pets and show dogs, too.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers
These retrievers are the smallest of their kind, but they sure don’t act small! They’re playful, energetic, and exceptionally fast swimmers. They have double coats that naturally repel water, helping them hunt, lure, and retrieve ducks and other waterfowl.

Portuguese Water Hounds
Originally from Algarve, Portugal, the Portuguese Water Hound is quite hard to find as they are a rare breed. These hardworking dogs were given the task of herding fish into nets and then taking them to the shore. The most famous Portuguese Water Hound is our first dog, Bo Obama, son of First Lady and President Barack Obama.

Labrador Retrievers
It’s no surprise that Labrador Retrievers adore water, since they are descendants of St. John’s Water Dogs. They used to help fishermen carry anything from ropes to fishing nets. They’re also very loyal, which makes them excellent companions. Labradors are well loved, ranking as the #1  breed in America, and are routinely used for water rescue missions.

Spanish Water Dogs
Spanish Water dogs are energetic, intelligent, and agile, as they can do anything from hunting to herding. They can be taught a great number of skills, but what they love to do best is engage in water sports.

Newfoundlands
These large dogs were bred to haul fishnets and heavy equipment from the water to the shore. “Newfies” have long coats that are thick, oily and waterproof, making them well-suited for swimming. Plus, their huge lung capacity is an advantage when it comes to swimming long distances.

Poodles
Despite being fluffy and “prissy,” standard poodles are actually excellent gundogs. They’re considered working dogs in the same category as retrievers. Those flamboyant (and sometimes ridiculous) hairdos? Their fur is designed to protect the joints when they dive into cold water. They’re also intelligent and hypoallergenic, making them great family pets.

Chesapeake Bay Retrievers
This large breed is believed to have been sired by two Newfoundlands several generations ago, then crossed with other breeds. Chessies have water-repellent wavy double coats and webbed toes to help them swim! Chessies are intelligent, protective, and very loyal.

English Setters
These setters might look a bit unusual with their speckled or mottled coats, but English Setters are intelligent, sensitive dogs who love the water. Their “belton” coats have many recognized combinations, such as white and black, white and orange, and even some with a tricolor belton of white, black and tan.

Move over Michael Phelps, these aquatic pooches are ready to dive in headfirst!

Dog Breeds by Fur: Low to High Maintenance Pooches


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When deciding on the best dog for your family, grooming responsibilities probably don’t top of the list of criteria during breed selection. However, depending on your financial situation and time constraints, hair may be a factor worth considering. Depending on the type of dog and their grooming needs, you could be visiting a professional groomer as much as every two-four weeks, or at a minimum, intensively brushing at home on a daily basis. Here’s a rundown of the lowest to highest maintenance pups when it comes to hair, which should help with setting expectations, planning and budgeting.

Short-haired, smaller dogs are going to require the least amount of grooming. An important caveat however is that even though these breeds are short-haired, they will still shed somewhat as all dogs shed some fur. Check out these breeds with low grooming needs if you’d rather not trade in your day job for a styling gig.

Italian Greyhound
Boston Terrier
Miniature Pinscher
• Harrier
Dalmation
• Whippet
• German Pinscher
• Basenji
• Australian Kelpie
Weimaraner
Vizsla
• English Foxhound
Boxer
Rottweiler
• Black & Tan Coonhound
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Mastiff
Great Dane
Bloodhound
• Neapolitan Mastiff

talk-ab-fur-thumbnailConversely, if you can’t resist a fluffy, long-haired pup, target this list of styling breeds, who require more hands-on attention to their coats to avoid matting, shedding and hygiene issues.

Akita
Alaskan Malamute
• Bearded Collie
Bernese Mountain Dog
Bichon Frise
• Border Terrier (or most terriers, for that matter)
Bulldog
Chow Chow
Cockapoo
Cocker Spaniel (and most other Spaniels)
Collie
• English or Irish Setter
• Giant, Standard and Miniature Schnauzers
Havanese
Lhasa Apso
Maltipoo
Old English Sheepdog (and other sheep dogs)
• Pekingese
Pomeranian
Poodle
Portuguese Water Dog
Shih Tzu
Siberian Husky